Tag Archives: NAB

How To Use Existing Podcasts To Kickstart Your Radio Network



When radio stations consider creating a podcasting strategy, they typically think in terms of leveraging existing radio talent, resources and content to create podcasts.

But why not try the reverse: leveraging existing podcasts to give struggling radio networks a booster shot – or simply add more great content to your current lineup?

As of April 2018, there are over 200,000 active podcasts and 500,000+ shows total. If you look at the sports category alone, there are thousands of shows and many are dedicated to content that would appeal to a local audience. With that much content being consistently created, there are a number of ways a radio station can leverage existing podcasts.

One would be to sign existing content creators into your distribution channel via content syndication. Radio has already mastered the art of programming syndication for broadcast, so it just makes sense to apply that model to podcasts.

By signing on existing podcast content, program managers can complement their current programming or fill gaps in the current lineup. This could be done creatively by re-packaging content to fit the traditional radio model, or slipping short segments of the content into locally-hosted and produced shows. Podcast creators would benefit both from the additional exposure to their show (offering opportunities to plug their show’s site or even working out a trade agreement to offer them ad spots to promote their podcast) as well as the opportunity to earn more money from their current sponsors by slipping sponsored spots into the body of the show.

While not all content would easily transition to on air-talent podcast content, by following this approach radio stations would be able to fill remnant airtime with content they could sell against with their own sales team. Better yet, podcasters often negotiate their own ad deals and could structure ads so that the radio portion is paid at the radio station’s normal rates for a time slot that they are given.

The world is changing, and in order for radio to stay competitive, it needs to move as fast as the rapidly-changing landscape. Just as radio networks are a natural pipeline for great podcast content, the same can work in reverse. Podcasts are rich soil, ready to be mined for content that with can be radio-ready with minimal production time and cost.

Are you a radio executive or building a content network? Blubrry will be at the NAB Show, ready to discuss your podcast strategy. Contact us if you’d like to schedule a meeting to get proactive and learn how to leverage the massive content pipeline that podcasting has to offer.

Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

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NAB’s Podcasting Pavilion with Blubrry and Ask the Expert



The National Association of Broadcasters is coming up soon, April 9-12 in Las Vegas, and this year a Podcasting Pavilion has been included; expect to see the Blubrry team and Chris Curran there. He’s made a name for himself with his audio engineering skills, and Blubrry has stood out in the podcasting industry being not only one of the first but, one of the most utilized companies out there for podcasters.

This year the new Podcasting Pavilion will be featuring an Ask the Expert booth that includes an area not only to test out 10 different microphones, but the opportunity to Chris Curran and his team any podcasting question you’d like.

 

Chris Curran:

Founder and lead instructor for the Podcast Engineering School, has an extensive history of working in audio, including loads of album credits. Founder of Fractal Recording he has been working in the podcasting industry for the past six years.

 

 

 

 

Radio executives, video creators, etc, stop by the Blubrry booth to talk with veterans in the field, and find out how you can get your podcast started, or take it to the next level with our help. We’ll see you there!

Thanks for listening to this episode and please subscribe. If you’d like to be on the show, email MacKenzie@Blubrry.com.

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Show notes:

NAB: April 9-12 exhibit area
Podcast Engineering School: Graduate from this school and become a full-time podcast producer.
Ask the Expert and Podcasting Pavilion: Check in with Chris.
Blubrry at NAB: Stop by or email to make an appointment to speak with us.

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Is Radio Missing the Mark in Podcasting?



Radio and podcasting are similar in many ways. But they also have drastic differences that we can help broadcasters understand at this year’s National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) Show. Along with a handful of other podcasting companies in the Podcasting Pavilion, we’ll be working hard to assist radio executive and creators in building a new digital strategy around their content in order to make the most of both of these complementary platforms.

In its original form, radio was news and storytelling: there are even sites dedicated to the upkeep of the original radio series of old. But, times have changed and the storytelling of old is now largely regulated to modern audiobooks. There is huge interest in deploying podcast at radio stations, but that interest often conflicts with the traditional linear radio programming model.

The answer: view podcasting and radio as complementary, instead of competing, audio platforms.

Almost everything of significance within a community is broadcast to the masses who are tuned-in during drive time. The interview with the college coach, local sports highlights, a rock band making its debut, food events, you name it – radio’s local focus makes live content an important part of any community. But increasingly, todays’ listeners also seek out – and are accustomed to – on-demand content that they can stream or download and listen to whenever and wherever they like.

The best strategy, then, is not a matter of either/or, but of carefully planning to make the most of each kind of audio consumption. Live, local broadcasts, combined with some original content, can keep digital listeners engaged beyond the range of the radio transmitter. And best yet, this approach allows radio stations to build their brand, instead of getting lost in an app with 1000’s of others. The radio station’s website can become the default go-to page for local content that listeners can subscribe and listen to on demand.

Radio-to-podcast isn’t as simple as just dumping an entire program into one episode. No one wants to listen to a podcast composed of three hours of morning drive – in fact, that is the absolute last thing a station should do. But short segments of content that keep listeners tuned in are the same kind of thing listeners will consume on their own time.

By using the power of broadcast to promote the podcast, and the podcast to promote the radio station, the two mediums create a symbiotic relationship that can lead listeners to cross over in both directions.

Radio needs to become a key voice in this consistently-growing medium, and podcasting companies like Blubrry have the tools and services to help stations take off quickly — at price points that will not require an executive meeting. The Blubrry team has been working with radio networks for at least three years, advising them on how to implement successful podcasting strategies for their digital networks. With our guidance, radio networks can implement successful strategies that allow the two models to complement each other.

We’ll see you at NAB soon, so contact us if you’d like to schedule a meeting to help you hit the mark in podcasting.

 

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Will Podcasting Save Radio?



In a few short weeks, broadcast executives will make their way to the National Association of Broadcasters show in Las Vegas. For the first time, NAB has a dedicated Podcasting Pavilion that will feature a dozen or so vendors that work in the podcasting space, and RawVoice/Blubrry will be there to talk with radio executives, creators and any attendee looking to launch a show or build a powerful network. 

Why has NAB sanctioned a Podcast Pavilion? Simple: podcasting is hot, and continues on an upward trajectory.

If you have young adults, you’ve likely noticed they are not listening to much radio. And with the proliferation of smartphones, consumers of audio content have a huge opportunity to listen to content from a variety of sources that continue to grow their podcasting catalogs, whether it be Spotify, Pandora, or Apple. Podcasts are everywhere now.

Radio can withstand another 20 years, solely because listening on your car drive is still important to some. And radio is still largely regional, which can serve an important purpose. But that won’t be enough to sustain the medium without some forward-thinking intervention. With apps like Waze eliminating the need for local traffic reporting and a large selection of music apps, radio stations will need to work harder and harder to stay relevant as more and more people discover alternative services with music you’d never hear on the airwaves. Even iHeart Radio, known for years as a frontrunner in streaming audio, filed for bankruptcy just a few days ago. 

The radio industry truly does have some brilliant creators out there that — if given a chance and budget — would likely make a huge impact and garner millions of listeners if allowed to do what they do best. And in theory, radio professionals are already at an advantage when it comes to podcasting success. “Broadcasters are already producing content every single day in studios and with equipment that most podcasters would kill to have,” suggests Zack East, Brand and Station Manager at Midwest Family Broadcasting in Benton Harbor, MI, and also a Blubrry customer.

At Blubrry, we don’t care how people listen to audio content – so long as they listen! We have extensive experience working with radio groups across the U.S. and globally – and we make it easy to make the transition. “To offset the very reasonable cost of Blubrry’s services, we started charging our clients a very low per-podcast sponsorship fee to have their name and billboard mentioned in each podcast,” explains East. “In just 6 months, we’ve sold roughly 25% of our nearly 60+ podcasts – new money from the same production already hitting the air, in most cases. We’ve also created new podcasts on behalf of our clients. Those are new podcasts that didn’t exist and are completely client-focused, but hosted by our on-air staff, and hosted on our station website. So, the station benefits from the exposure to the client’s customers, and the client benefits from the promotion of the podcast being hyper-locally focused to the area.”

This forward-thinking approach to making top-notch content available on-demand is what will keep radio relevant in the years to come. Not only does it give younger generations – used to having complete control over their personal entertainment – a reason to keep checking in to what the station is doing, but podcast content can support radio content and vice versa, reminding radio listeners who aren’t yet avid podcast listeners that podcasting is another great option, while reminding die-hard podcast listeners that there is still value in radio.

Time will tell how long it takes radio executives to determine when it is time to add podcasting to their programming mix. Public Radio figured it out a long time ago, but it will take a little longer for the commercial radio space to fully embrace podcasting. But to us at Blubrry it’s a no-brainer: while radio is local, podcasting is global, and we live in a global world.

There are opportunities to serve both and open revenue streams only dreamed about by local stations. Catch the Blubrry team at NAB to discuss those opportunities: we may not be radio insiders, but we are podcasting masters and can provide tools, service, consulting and simple advice to become radio’s savior. Take it from the forward-thinking East: “A year ago, when we first ventured in to serious podcasting, we didn’t know what it could produce for us in terms of new revenue and bringing people to our stations. Now I’m not sure where we’d be without it!”

Get an exhibit pass to visit the Blubrry team at NAB.

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