All posts by Blubrry

How to Use Podcast SEO to Grow Your Audience



Podcast SEO | BlubrryPodcast SEO

Podcast SEO can feel overwhelming — you just want to share your stories and point of view with as many listeners as you are able. It can also lead you down some analysis paralysis rabbit holes. In this post we will help you understand what Podcast SEO is, why you might need it, and what some podcast SEO best practices are — all so you can grow your podcast audience. If you really want to nerd out and dig in to SEO in general, be sure to check out the Beginner’s Guide to SEO over on Moz.

What is Podcast SEO?

SEO is short for Search Engine Optimization. It’s a suite of black magic marketing approaches intended to increase the visibility of a website or other web property on a Search Engine Results Page (AKA “SERP”). Google and Apple Podcasts are the two largest as far as podcast discovery is concerned. Ideally, your podcast and/or episodes show up near the top of the search results for things your listeners are interested in. For example when searching for Geek News on Apple Podcasts, Geek News, the podcast Geek News Central from our CEO, Todd Cochrane, is the third result for Podcasts.

Why Do I Need Podcast SEO?

Content may still be king, but being the king of an undiscoverable kingdom isn’t really why you started your podcast, is it? Unlike that baseball movie, if you build it, they will only come if they can find it. There are many ways to build your podcast audience, from advertising, to events to good ol’ fashioned word of mouth. But ensuring your podcast SEO is following best practices is kind of like the old adage “fish where the fish are:” your podcast is the bait & hook and podcast SEO helps you cast that fishing line right into the middle of all those searches. So if you want a long-term marketing solution that will help bring an audience to your podcast, you need good SEO.

How to Grow Your Podcast with SEO

You’ve got a podcast, or are about to launch one, and you’re wondering how to grow your podcast audience. No big deal, right? The good news is that podcast listenership is projected to grow at 15-20% per year for the next several years. The bad news is that because of the increasing popularity of podcasts and podcasting, there is a constant flood of new content. Cutting through that clutter to build an audience for your podcast is increasingly difficult. But it’s not impossible. And one of the most effective, long-term tools in your arsenal is to set your podcast up for SEO love.

Podcast SEO Best Practices

Optimizing your podcast for discovery follows a lot of the same technical factors that traditional SEO does. Which means that if you keep your audience’s interests–and how you can genuinely help them discover fascinating content that answers the question(s) they type into that search box–front and center, it’s pretty hard to go wrong.

Here are some podcast SEO best practices:

  1. Humans beat crawlers in the long term: always write your titles, descriptions, and notes in way that answer a specific question an audience might have. Trying to game the system might get you clicks initially, but those audience members will quickly abandon your show if it’s not answering their questions.
  2. Put the keywords as close to the beginning of your title, description, and notes as possible. Remember that fishing analogy? Well, just like goldfish, audiences have short attention spans. Make sure you show them, right up front, that your show can help them.
  3. Use the right tools. Version 6.0 of PowerPress has some truly fantastic SEO tools built right in. There’s a great (short) article about using the podcast SEO tools built in to PowerPress over at Blubrry.com.
  4. Social media engagement has a direct correlation with search rankings. The more people engage with your podcast on the various social platforms, the more search engines like Google see you as a reputable source for your key topics/keywords.
  5. There’s more to SEO than just keywords. Design and user experience on your website and even podcast artwork play a role as well. If someone searches, clicks your link on the SERP, but then immediately leaves your site or stops your podcast, the search engines don’t like that. Their assumption is that the searcher did not find the answer to their question with you, so the search engines might not rank you as highly for those keywords anymore. But, what if you really did have great content in that podcast, it was just really hard for the searcher to find it because of how your website is designed? That’s a bad user experience design problem. Great news is that there are a bazillion website builder tools out there. Blubrry offers PowerPress Sites, the most comprehensive, customizable podcast package available.

Now you know what podcast SEO is, why you might need it, and some podcast SEO best practices. There are, obviously, plenty more you could do to improve your podcast discovery and increase your audience via SEO. We’d love to chat–hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or if you’re a Blubrry customer reach out to one of our real, live, actual human beings in Blubrry Support.

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What Is A Podcast RSS Feed?



RSS feeds aren’t exactly user friendly to all, so we wanted to simplify them a bit so that everyone can understand. We explain not only what a podcast feed is but the importance of having one.

What is a podcast RSS feed anyway?

RSS stands for “Rich Site Syndication” or “Really Simple Syndication”. In short, according to Wikipedia, RSS “is a type of web feed which allows users to access updates to online content in a standardized, computer-readable format.” In human language, that means you and your audience can use an RSS feed to consume your content someplace other than your website. Remember blog aggregators/readers? That’s how they work(ed). And, if you have a podcast, the podcast RSS feed is how platforms like Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, and others get your podcast info: they are more like an old-school phonebook, in that they simply list your information, but your podcast is actually served from wherever you host your media files. Your podcast RSS feed tells them things like your show name, the podcast episode title, the duration, etc. By the way, if you’re looking for an incredibly flexible, fast, stable place to host your podcast media files, be sure to check out our Podcast Hosting plans. Or, if you’re wondering how to get your podcast on Apple Podcasts, check out our step by step guide.

Why you need a podcast RSS feed

Put yourself in your listener’s shoes… or eyes & ears… for a minute. When you post anything to your website, your RSS feed defaults to listing a certain number of your most recent items. For example, WordPress defaults to listing the 10 most recent posts. The thing is, podcast readers will ignore anything in the default RSS feed that isn’t a podcast. So, if you’re publishing a handful of blog posts per month as well as a podcast per week, your default feed will only serve up those four podcasts. Your listeners are missing out.

BUT! If you have a podcast-only RSS feed as Blubrry users do, your listeners will have access to more of your awesomeness because the feed won’t be filled up with blog post content. Just the podcasts. You should have a podcast-only RSS feed.

Three ways to create a podcast RSS feed

Something to seriously consider as you set out on your epic podcasting journey: do you want to own and control your podcast RSS feed? The answer, if you truly care about your own story, is most likely yes. In which case, read on.

  1. The PowerPress WordPress plugin. It’s free. It’s super simple. It’s one of the most trusted ways to share your story with the world. The PowerPress WordPress plugin makes creating your podcast RSS feed ridiculously easy. That’s why there are tens of thousands of active installs, all over the world. We began developing the PowerPress WordPress plugin way back in 2008 because we wanted an easier way to create a podcast RSS feeds for our own podcasts. There is even a step-by-step guide on how to create your podcast RSS feed over at Blubrry.com.
  2. If you don’t have a WordPress site we provide one to every customer for free and it has PowerPress included. There certainly are a plethora of other options, but none are as simple to use or widely adopted and it’s integrated into the free WordPress site for those that do not have one.
  3. There is no three.

Ok. Those are the basics of what a podcast RSS feed is, why you might want one, and how to set up your very own podcast RSS feed. Be sure to check back often for more podcast RSS tips and tricks. And, as always, if you’re a Blubrry customer and you have any questions at all, give us a call. We have real, live humans ready, willing and able to help you build your podcast– including technical support in setting up a podcast RSS feed.

We should also mention that sometimes our corporate customers or podcasters experimenting in the space do not want to go the WordPress route. That’s really ok as we have a solution for you where you can publish directly on Blubrry.com as well and we will provide you an RSS feed from there. We always want to suggest the best solutions first, as we truly believe you should build your brand on your .com this results in the best SEO for your show.

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Podcast Hosting Options and Your Content



Podcasters have lots of options today when it comes to hosting, which is really incredible considering how things were when Blubrry launched back in 2005. Having been in the space that long gives us a lot of perspective on the ease of which podcasters today can get their message out to the world versus how much more difficult it was five or ten years ago. If you hang out with any of our team members or listen to our podcast, you will quickly learn that we are podcasters first and foremost and very attuned to creator rights in regards to their content.

At Blubrry, we’re committed to providing top-notch services to podcasters. The products and services we provide allow those that use our services to launch their podcast in a way that allows them to control their brand, intellectual property, and of course their podcast feed. We are confident that, three or six months down the road, podcasters who sign on with our services will feel great about the choice they made to work with a company that respects those rights and makes it easy to retain ownership and control of their intellectual property.

By contrast, today we often get calls from podcasters who have realized they made some podcast service provider selection missteps when they launched their shows.

These run the full gambit, but for most, it’s the realization that they are building their show/brand on top of rented land and that they would much rather be promoting their own .com versus promoting the brand or vertical their show is on. With Google, today entering the scene with Google Podcasts the value of building your SEO for your own site is much more appealing than building the SEO of your host.

Today, podcasting is big business, with many models to choose from. While a few of our offerings are free, notably the PowerPress Plugin & basic Podcast Stats, most of our products and services – like hosting and pro stats – have subscription costs. While some podcast offerings out there today are attempting to forge new business models, our perspective in the space requires us to consider creators first and not risk our customers’ shows with business models we have seen come and go.

“Podcasting companies are more than a place to host your media,” explains Blubrry/RawVoice CEO Todd Cochrane. “At Blubrry, we have a diverse team that is involved in support, development, monetization and podcaster advocacy. We work behind the scenes with groups such as the IAB to make sure your podcast stats are IAB compliant. At the same time, we consistently maintain and update our infrastructure and continue to develop new and existing services.”

All this requires time, resources, and yes money – so if a company is providing you a service and not charging you for it, their business model necessitates generating significant revenue to pay salaries, benefits, infrastructure, rent and more. In that circumstance, the value you’re “trading” them is often not well defined, but may include access to and control of your content. We would argue that your content is far more valuable than what we charge you to host it and is, in fact, too valuable to trade away for access to “free” services.

A free podcast host might be a good fit for you if you’re testing out podcasting. However, keep in mind that a free service may restrict your ability to monetize your podcast yourself. You may not be able to access your own analytics, and if your host owns your feed, they may also insert their own ads or even remove your show without warning. The more control you give up of your content and where it lives, the more likely a change to the company’s business model or terms of service will negatively affect you.

At Blubrry we start with the simple premise that there are many benefits to podcasters owning and controlling their intellectual property, and we are committed to creating products and services that allow you to grow your show without our interference. It may not be free, but for those of us serious about building our brands, the cost is well worth paying.

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Happy 10th Birthday, PowerPress!



PowerPress Plugin

From its modest beginning on August 11, 2008, through the dozens of updates that led to its feature-packed modern incarnation, the PowerPress Plugin was born from a desire to help the podcasting community – and that commitment is just as strong today.

When a popular WordPress-based podcast plugin went under in 2007, the team at Blubrry saw the impact it was having on podcasters, and sprung into action to create a solution – and the rest is history.

Among many, many other changes and improvements, the 10-year history of PowerPress has included:

Some things, however, have never changed. The PowerPress plugin continues to be free, and is still cared for by its original developer, Blubrry CIO Angelo Mandato (for more on the history and future of PowerPress, listen to the most recent episode of the PowerPress Podcast.) Now powering between 60,000 and 80,000 podcasts, PowerPress remains stable and forward-thinking: ready to handle a continuing increase of listeners and imminent new technology like implementation into vehicles.

Happy birthday, PowerPress! We’re excited to watch you continue to power podcasts for the next decade and beyond.

 

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Cardioid, Omnidirectional, Dynamic, Condenser: What Kind Of Mic Is Best For Podcasting?



Whether you’re just getting started podcasting or ready to upgrade your equipment, choosing a mic can be one of the most confusing decisions you make. There are a ton of options out there, and podcasters have some very definite opinions about which microphones are best…but first, you have to make two choices.

Cardioid Vs. Omnidirectional: 

A cardioid or hypercardioid microphone (like the Audio Technica AR-2100 or RØDE Podcaster) records from a specific area of the mic, while an omnidirectional mic picks up sound equally from all areas of the mic.

“For podcasting, you’re basically always going to want a cardioid or hypercardioid microphone,” says Brian Thomas, audio engineer and owner of Yōkai Audio. “The polar pattern of a cardioid microphone allows you to focus on the sound you want, like your voice, while minimizing the sounds you don’t want – i.e., everything else.” (For more information on how to use your microphone’s polar pattern to your advantage, check out this thorough article.)

Cardioid/hypercardioid mics are usually the better choice for podcasters for a couple of reasons, says Thomas.

First, very few podcasters are able to record in ideal conditions. “Cardioid/hypercardioid mics allow you use the microphone’s “dead spot” at the back of the capsule to minimize unwanted noise,” says Thomas. “If you have a loud heating duct or rumbly refrigerator, you can point the back of your microphone at it and significantly reduce its presence on your recording.”

Second, if you’re recording multiple people in the same room, you’ll want to be able to isolate your signals as much as possible. “You can point two cardioid mics 180 degrees away from each other and use the dead spots at the back of the capsule to minimize bleed between the microphones,” suggests Thomas.

There may be circumstances in which an omnidirectional microphone is the better choice for a podcaster – for example, if you’re recording on location, and the background noise is an important part of the podcast’s ambiance. And some podcasters use omnidirectional mics to capture the voices of several people at once into a single mic. Beware, though, that since a single mic is capturing the sound, there won’t be a way to separate those voices later to level them out or make isolated adjustments. For all these reasons, Thomas highly recommends recording each individual on their own cardioid mic.

Dynamic Vs. Condenser:

The choice between dynamic and condenser microphones is mostly one of personal preference, but you’ll want to keep a few things in mind. First, condensers are generally more sensitive than dynamic mics, which means you’ll get a crisper, more detailed sound. But, that also makes condensers more prone to picking up background noises you don’t necessarily want (remember what we said earlier about refrigerators, air conditioners and the other less-than-ideal realities home podcasters dal with?) and may also exaggerate lip smacking, breathing and other sounds you’d rather didn’t come across on your recording.  Condenser mics also require an external power source. That said, many podcasters successfully use condenser mics and prefer them to dynamic; just keep in mind your recording location and other factors when choosing.

The absolute best way to choose a mic, suggests Thomas, is to head to a local retailer and try them for yourself. If that’s not realistic, ask around: forums, blog posts and Amazon reviews are a great way to find out which mics are favorites of other podcasters…and why.

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One Surprising Thing Podcasters Can Learn From Alex Jones and InfoWars



Earlier this week, Apple made big news when the company, citing hate speech, removed 5 of the 6 podcasts hosted by Alex Jones of InfoWars.com. 

What you may not know is that, when podcasts are removed from the Apple Podcast Directory, they also automatically disappear from many other apps. That’s because most podcast apps are powered by the Apple Podcast Directory via an Apple-controlled API. This means that the app owners don’t have to make difficult decisions about content – but it also means that they don’t have the ability to individually control the way podcasts appear on their app, or whether they appear at all.

Apple does it essentially by proxy: because these apps largely do not have their own infrastructure to maintain a master list of shows, what you end up with is one entity controlling 95% of all master show listings across both iOS and Android.

But while Jones’ podcasts have disappeared from most podcast apps, the show can still be found. That’s because Alex Jones actually made one smart move: he controlled his RSS feed right from the start.

“It’s always the extreme cases that bring out the true power of RSS,” says Todd Cochrane, CEO of Blubrry/Rawvoice. “We advocate podcasts controlling their RSS feeds for many reasons, and this kind of event just highlights that necessity. InfoWars is an extreme show, but like it or not, it’s still on the air because they control their own RSS feed.” If their hosting provider had controlled their RSS feed like thousands of shows today they would be off the air.

Sure, most podcasters don’t have such controversial shows that we’d ever have to worry about an outright ban from Apple. But any time your show is completely controlled by another entity – such as a podcast host that owns or controls your feed or Apple Podcasts account – you’re ultimately at their mercy. A change to their platform technology, algorithms, or business model, and who knows what could happen to your show?

But by owning your feed and Apple Podcasts listing, at least you can ultimately control your own content and make a Plan B as the podcasting landscape continues to evolve.

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3 #Podcasting Conferences To Check Out Now That #PM2018 Is In The Books



For many podcasters, Podcast Movement is the big event we look forward to all year. If you made it this year, you’re probably feeling some letdown that it’s all over. If you didn’t, you are probably already looking forward to making your way to Orlando next year.
But while you can snag your PM 2019 ticket now, you don’t have to wait a year to learn, network, and have fun with other podcasters! Here are some events to look forward to, coming up in just the next few months:

Midatlantic Podcast Conference (MAPCON)

Tickets are still available for this event, taking place in Philadelphia/NJ on September 7-8, 2018. Expect plenty of information-packed panels, inspiring keynotes, and opportunities to network with other podcasters from the mid-Atlantic region and beyond

Third Coast Audiofestival

Head to Chicago October 4-6, 2018 to experience this unique event, celebrating audio storytelling via a multitude of platforms. Programming includes two days of learning about the art & craft of audio storytelling, plenty of opportunities to connect with other podcasters and audio content creators, and an awards ceremony honoring the winners of the 2018 Third Coast / Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Competition.  

Werkit

WYNC’s annual gathering of women shaping the future of podcasting will take place November 13-14, 2018, in NYC. This two-day event offers workshops, networking opportunities, live tapings, one-on-one mentoring sessions, and your chance to pitch a show, incubate a pilot and possibly score a development deal with WNYC Studios!
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Taking Your Show On The Road: Inspiration & Tips For The Nomadic Podcaster



Okay, maybe podcasting on the beach is more fantasy than reality. But if you’ve ever dreamed of living a nomadic lifestyle – or just think it would be fun to take your podcast on the road with you when you go on vacation – you might wonder how on-the-go podcasters make it work.

Luckily, with some planning, podcasting from the road is very possible, whether you’re embarking on a series of live interviews cross-country, or just want to record, publish, and edit from a hotel room. Here are some tips from mobile podcasters who’ve been there:

1) Create Smart Systems

“Publishing is so easy on the road as long as you have all the pieces with you,”says Jane Ellen, founder and host of the Glistening Particles podcast. Jane, who travels for a month each summer, finds that having specific systems for recording and publishing are key to helping her continue to get fresh content out weekly.

Recording is, obviously, the first step. Right after recording her podcast, while she’s still in front of the mic, Ellen does three things: first, she records a 10-15 minute audio for her social media person, so she will have the essence of the conversation and topic without having to listen to the entire episode. Second, she records her intro and outro. Then, she stores all the files in Dropbox so she can access them from anywhere. “The whole idea is to minimize the number of touches and have the pieces ready to go and accessible,” says Ellen. And while it’s certainly possible to record while on the road, the versatility of podcasting makes it easy to record as much as possible ahead of time to reduce the need to record in unfamiliar environments.

Publishing is typically easier to do on the road, but it still helps to have systems in place. Jane says she will often edit and mix final audio and writes her show notes while on the road – even while on a plane. As soon as she gets to decent wifi, she can publish the episode. “If I’m only doing editing & publishing all I need are headphones and my MacBook. If I think I’ll need to record some extra pieces or ads, I’ll bring my small Sure MV5 USB mic.”

When schedules are unpredictable and wifi isn’t guaranteed, the key to recording, publishing, and key is to create systems that take advantage of uninterrupted blocks of work time and access to high-quality wifi, when you have it. The more you get done when opportunity strikes and the easier you make it to access everything you need later, the less you’ll have to scramble to make things work in less-than-ideal circumstances.

2) Plan For Emergencies

“When traveling, assume stuff is going to break,” advises Brian Thomas, owner of Yōkai Audio in Kalamazoo, MI and sound engineer for podcasts including Make Light and Crunchy Cocktail Hour. “Bring extra cables, batteries, microphones, and devices if you can afford them. Have a backup plan for what you’re going to do when a critical piece of equipment goes down, starts on fire, or gets a pitcher of beer spilled on it.” When recording while on vacation or doing on-site interviews, that last warning may be more likely to come true than you think!

3) Take Time For Good Sound

Though you may not be able to take your full home studio on the road with you, that doesn’t mean you have to give up on sound quality. No matter where you’ll be recording, here are two simple steps you can take to improve sound quality.

Choose the right place to record. Thomas suggests checking the acoustics in an interior space by clapping your hands together slowly, but as loudly as you can, walking around the room. “Listen to the way the sound of your claps changes as you walk from place to place,” he suggests. “Chances are, your claps will echo or reverberate at least a little. Rooms with high ceilings and unadorned walls tend to have great big booming echoes, which will definitely come through on your recording. Find the space with the smallest amount of echo/shortest reverberation – that’s where you want to record.” This might be a place you least expect, like a walk-in closet, or even the front seat of your car.

Make sure you’re holding your mic to your best advantage.  If you’re using a cardioid microphone (like the Audio Technica ATR-2100 or Rode NT1-A, for example), there will be parts of the mic’s barrel that capture sound much more readily than others. You can use the mic’s “dead spot” to your advantage if you’re recording in a noisy restaurant or outdoor space. “Recording in a public space containing more audio than just the voices of yourself and your guest can help tell the story you’re trying to convey by providing a context, but you don’t want it to overpower your conversation,” Thomas points out. “Use the dead spot to keep those extra noises safely in the background of your interview.” Read more about getting the best possible sound from your mic. 

Above all, don’t let technology stop you. Chances are good that the same setup you use at home can be easily taken on the road with a little modification. For live two-person recordings, the Zoom H6 is a favorite. Other than that, you’ll need reliable wifi at least some of the time, just like you would at home.

And while it can take some getting used to, mobile podcasting can also lead to fresh inspiration and experiences you’d never have in a home studio. Jane Ellen shares her best on-the-road experience: “A person sitting next to me on the plane asked me what I was doing, and after I explained and showed them how to get to my show, I got to see them listen to an entire episode during the flight and give me immediate feedback! It was bliss.”

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What Do Podcasters Need To Know About GDPR?



If you’re like most of us, over the last couple of weeks your inbox has likely been flooded with emails from companies you’re connected with, explaining their privacy policies in light of the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which regulates the ways controllers and processors of personally-identifying information (like email addresses and names) can collect and use that information.

GDPR can be confusing, and podcasters aren’t always sure how this EU regulation might impact them. Here are answers to some common questions you may have about GDPR and how it affects you as a podcaster:

Which groups or organizations is GDPR really aimed at?

There are two terms defined by GDPR that are important; a controller of data and a processor of data,” says attorney Barry Kantz, General Counsel and CFO of RawVoice and Blubrry. “At Blubrry, we take the position that we are the controller of the data, because we make the decisions about how the data is used, whereas a processor of data is someone who the controller hires to process their data.” 

Is the typical podcaster either processing or controlling data? 

Technically speaking, a podcaster generates the process, whereby we collect the data,” explains Kantz. “An analogy is the customer who walks into a store and makes a purchase. The customer generates or starts the data collection process, and the store engages in. Many podcasters believe that Blubrry is a processor and the podcaster is the controller, but this interpretation would require every podcaster to have a complex legal contract with Blubrry.”

The reason for the million emails you’re suddenly getting? Transparency. “The GDPR requirement is that we implement their regulations and notify users.”

What safeguards can a podcaster put in place to be in compliance? 

As the controller of the data, Blubrry puts all the necessary safeguards into place when it comes to your podcast files. “With audience tools and measurement, Blubrry does not store any personally identifiable information,” explains Angelo Mandato, CIO of Blubrry. “For podcast measurement specifically, we use what is called pseudo-anonymization – a technique where the IP address is randomly changed in a way that it cannot identify the original address.”

But that doesn’t mean that podcasters are totally off the hook. “Being that most podcasters are also website owners, podcasters need to be cautious what information they gather from their web visitors,” explains Mandato. “For example, if you provide a survey for your audience, do not ask for information that may identify the listener, like their email address or name. Being smart about what you do on your website and you should be okay as far as GDPR is concerned.”

Does a podcaster need to make a public statement of some sort to their audience?

It depends. If you are collecting data for a newsletter, or capturing and retaining audience email and data, at that point you become the controller of that data and must comply with GDPR, says Mandato. Since Blubrry isn’t involved with the data collection that happens on your website or via your email list, we aren’t the controller of that information and aren’t responsible for how it is collected or how you communicate with your audience. 

So what’s the bottom line? 

“Podcasters need to realize that if they have listeners in the EU, they do have to make sure their podcast host is GDPR compliant,” says Todd Cochrane, CEO of Blubrry. And even if your show doesn’t currently have EU listeners, there’s nothing to stop it from growing into that market, so that means your podcast host should be GDPR compliant – no matter what.

Also, consider what information you are personally collecting from your audience, maybe without even knowing it. “If a podcaster is allowing comments on their website or has a mailing list, then the podcaster is responsible for making sure they are GDPR compliant,” says Cochrane.

Finally, make sure you are transparent about your data collection practices. There are tools out there to help you – for example, Akismet’s Anti-Spam plugin now adds GDPR disclaimers to the bottom of your comment collection system.

Bottom line: It’s not that hard to comply, so just do it already. “While I doubt the EU will ever go after a podcaster’s website,” says Cochrane, “It’s better to be safe than sorry.”

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Podcast Pride: 6 LGBTQ Podcasts To Add To Your Queue



June is LGBTQ Pride Month, and what better way to celebrate than by expanding your podcast catalog to include some great LGBTQ-related content?

The Blubrry Directory has had an LGBTQ category since day 1, so we’ve got a lot of shows in our community to choose from. Here are 6 to check out:

 

 

 

Dyking Out

Dyking Out is an interview-based news, pop culture, and lifestyle podcast hosted by New York City-based lesbian comedians Carolyn Bergier and Sarah York. Recent episodes topics have included representation in movies, Femme invisibility, and “sex with dudes.”

Who Invited Her?

Who Invited Her? is a San Diego-based podcast featuring co-hosts Tony, Bastian and Megan. The three discuss pop culture from an LGBT perspective. Recent interviews have featured podcaster Fagsy Malone, model Eddie Danger and comedian Sarah Burford.

Gay Ambitions

In the Gay Ambitions podcast, host Paul “seeks to inspire and empower ambitious LGBTIQ listeners with the best ideas and insights from LGBTIQ entrepreneurs, thought leaders, world class athletes, and influencers.” Recent episodes have tackled topics like financial planning, politics and creating more productive habits. 

Gayish

Gayish “bridges the gap between sexuality and actuality” with co-hosts Mike and Kyle. Recent episode titles include Unicorns, Hockey, and Gay Dating.

Not Gay Enough

Not Gay Enough is a movie and TV review podcast covering a wide variety of LGBTQA+ content. Recent episodes include discussions of Fright Night, The Lost Boys, and Sabrina The Teenage Witch.

Queer4Queer

Hosted by best friends Molly & Ash, Queer4Queer is a comedy podcast about LGBTQ dating. Recent episodes include Dungeons & Dragons & Dating, Flirting, and Queer Icons.

What are you waiting for? Celebrate Pride month by checking out these LGBTQ+ podcasts. Listen, subscribe, and share!

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