All posts by Blubrry

Video Podcast, Audio Podcast, or Both?



 

This ostrich is ready for her closeup. Are you? Think about Video Podcasting, then. As podcasting continues to grow–in terms of audience size and podcast producers–there will inevitably be bright shiny new things that come along. Podcasting even started out being called “audioblogging” back in the day. But when portable MP3 players, most notably the iPod, came along, the term Podcasting took hold. And now, with ubiquitous video platforms like YouTube, video podcasting has become increasingly popular. But should your podcast be audio-only? Video-only? Both? Read on for some thoughts and tips.

Benefits of Audio Podcast

  1. Easy to consume: commute time, doing housework, sitting sipping your favorite beverage.
  2. Supported by all the major podcast discovery platforms
  3. It’s the status quo: people are used to it
  4. Relatively low production cost: for a couple hundred bucks and a computer–or, even just with your smartphone–you can be up and running without having to shell out big bucks for video gear.
  5. Smaller file size means less media hosting costs. Of course, we think you ought to check out our Podcast Media Hosting because it’s flexible, has no-fault overage for when you might accidentally go over your limit in any given month, and complimentary support from real live humans that you can call or video conference with. Yeah. Real humans.

Benefits of Video Podcasting

  1. We’re a visual species. University of Rochester researchers note that “more than 50 percent of the cortex, the surface of the brain, is devoted to processing visual information,” and, according to Discover Magazine, only 3 percent of neurons are devoted to hearing. So. Give your audience something their body is built for: visuals.
  2. If anybody tells you you’ve got a face for radio, tell them to get their eyes checked. You’re awesome and ready for your close up.
  3. Communicate more effectively: 55% of communication is nonverbal, how you look or what you’re doing when you say something carries more weight than tone of voice and the actual words you use. Some concepts are easier to communicate via video, too.
  4. Continually decreasing production costs. It used to be fairly expensive to create quality video content. But the camera on your smartphone is ridiculously good now. Plus, there are a plethora of excellent video editing programs for both Android and iOS devices.
  5. Great for the hearing impaired. This one is pretty self explanatory.

Why Creating a Video Podcast and Audio Podcast Might Be Right for You

You’re already doing most of the work towards creating a video podcast every time you create your audio podcast: planning, podcast show notes, recording great audio, etc. If you get even a simple smartphone mini tripod for as little as $10, point it at your face (and your guests, if you have them), you’re in the video podcasting business). There are also variety of video conferencing platforms that allow you to record the video for when your guests may not be in the same location as you.

What’s more, any time you can give your audience and potential audience more ways to discover and consume the amazing content you’re producing, you’re helping grow your audience.

Please follow and like us:

Podcasting with Your Kids



Podcasting with kids: Photo by Hal Gatewood on Unsplash

 

Tips for parent podcasters looking to get into podcasting with their kids.

Podcasting has made the unimaginable possible for the hundreds of thousands of adults who have fallen in love with the content art form, and now some parent podcasters are daring to invite their children on to their shows. The result? Podcasts suitable for the entire family, an enriching learning experience for the children listening to the podcasts, and the children featured on the podcasts.

Interested in how to podcast with your kids and/or looking for some inspiration from folks doing podcasting with kids right? Read on.

Three tips to get you started on podcasting with your kids

  1. No pressure. Keep it fun. Podcasting should always be fun for your kids. Make sure they’re up for the podcast and not at all stressed out over the experience. Set the stage for fun to be had. Keep all planning meetings short, sweet and productive.
  2. Engage your children in your season and episode prep. Your children will be more engaged, more prepared for each episode and have more fun podcasting if you involve them as much as possible in show and season prep. Plot out your season’s content and allow your children to shape the content of each episode. They’ll feel a sense of ownership and feel far more prepared if they know what’s coming. For example, if your podcast focuses on book reviews of early reader chapter books, you might ask your child to come up with the list of books to feature.
  3. Prep before each segment. The segment prep may vary depending on your child’s age. But given most children’s attention spans, you’ll have more luck breaking your show’s recording into 5-10 minute segments that you can edit together afterwards. To prep for each segment let your child know what the objective is for each segment. For example: let your child know what you’ll be talking about and what point you’ll be hoping to make. Be careful here! Don’t prep too much or you’ll lose the natural flow and miss out on their beautiful and uncensored thoughts.

Three Great Podcasts Featuring Children as Co-Hosts or Hosts

  1. Dream Big: celebrity interviews, award winners and experts all interviewed by Eva Karpman, 7, and her mother. They’re on a mission to help kids find and follow their dreams. Unique mother/daughter chemistry and banter, mixed with celebrity guests? Yes please.
  2. Science is Fun E: STEM isn’t just another acronym on this podcast hosted by Avery Adams, 9, and Skipper. It’s a fresh look at science, technology and… monsters. Sometimes.
  3. Brains on!: Molly Bloom hosts this incredible, award-winning podcast for kids (and families). Each week a different kid joins Molly as co-host to ask and answer killer questions about life, the universe, and everything.

Podcasting with your kids can be fun and rewarding. It’s also a fast-growing podcasting niche with plenty of room for you to make your own podcast shine.

What are your favorite podcasts featuring kids as host and/or co-host? Let us know in the comments or on Facebook or Twitter.

Please follow and like us:

Advantages of Great Podcast Show Notes



 

podcast show notes | Blubrry

What Are Podcast Show Notes?

Podcast Show Notes are, essentially, the written version of your podcast. They can also contain links (and, if you use Blubrry, you can even link to specific time locations in your podcast), images, or even a whole dissertation. And having great podcast show notes is important. Read on to find out why, as well as a few simple tips to creating great podcast show notes.

5 Reasons You Should Have Podcast Show Notes

  1. It’ll help you be more structured (and your listeners will appreciate that). Let’s face it: there are a ton of less-than-stellar podcasts out there. Rambling, stream of consciousness stuff that muddies the discovery waters for folks trying to take their podcasting game up a notch or two. If you have podcast show notes and an outline– and stick to it– you will be-able to tell your story and share your views more succinctly and convincingly.
  2. Podcast show notes are searchable. Meaning, when someone is on the hunt for their next great podcast to get hooked on, one of the ways they’ll try to find it is by searching (Apple, Google, Spotify, etc.). If your podcast show notes are written well, there is an increased likelihood people will find you. There are, of course, more factors to ranking well in search and if you want to learn more, check out our recent post about podcast SEO.
  3. Podcast show notes give your audience another–sometimes more convenient–way to consume your content. Making a great show isn’t enough to become a podcasting titan and build a huge audience, unfortunately. You’ll need to supplement your audio (and/or video) with a variety of ways for your audience to consume the great content you’re producing. We’ll be writing about repurposing content in the months ahead, so stay tuned.
  4. Give more details. Maybe there is something you don’t want to go into or don’t have time to go into. Maybe it’s photos or video. Whatever the reason, podcast show notes are a fantastic place to expand on things. It’s a great way to continue connecting with your audience, building that relationship once bit at a time.
  5. Tell them what you’re going to tell them. There’s an old communications adage that goes something like “tell them what you’re going to tell them; tell them; then, tell them what you told them.” Your show summary can be the “tell them what you’re going to tell them” as well as the “tell them what you told them” parts. Giving your audience multiple touches can help your message stick with them better.

3 Tips for Making Great Podcast Show Notes

  1. Use Blubrry PowerPress WordPress plugin. It’s free. It’s super easy. And it’s one of the most widely used podcasting plugins. With PowerPress (and only with PowerPress), you have the ability to create an optimized Apple Podcast summary. That way, your show notes will look great and be helpful to your audience/potential audience members.
  2. Be descriptive, but not repetitive. Think about how your show will look in the app your audience uses to consume it. (As an aside, if you’re not sure what devices, where, or even when people are consuming your podcast, be sure to check our Blubrry Pro Stats). You want your podcast show notes to be helpful to a potential listener, so give them the most important stuff right up front.
  3. Give them the why. Simon Sinek has a great TED Talk about how people don’t buy the “what” or the “how” of a product or brand. They buy the why. Make sure your podcast show notes give a clear reason why someone might want to listen to/watch your podcast.

Podcast show notes are not just another thing to do for your podcast. They’re important and can help you build your audience if you make them useful.

Please follow and like us:

International Podcast Day, 2018



International Podcast Day, 2018

Each year podcasters from around the world focus on something pretty meta: celebrating the power of podcasts. The inaugural event in 2014 trended on Twitter for almost the entire day. And it’s only gotten bigger and better each year. This year, we reached out to International Podcast Day champions, Steve Lee and Dave Lee, to get their perspective on this popular podcasting event.

International Podcast Day 2018

Why do you do this year after year?

There is always a region or country that is growing in terms of podcasts being produced and the consumption of podcasts. That is an opportunity to highlight those regions and provide a voice to those podcasters and listeners. Just as the podcasting industry evolves year after year, so does the event and celebration.

And after 4 years of organizing the celebration, it’s evident that the podcast community is embracing the celebration. They plan meetups and social gatherings just for the day. People (podcasters, listeners, producers, networks, etc.) look forward to the celebration and that keeps us motivated and excited.

What is the coolest thing that has happened since it started?

One of the coolest things that has happened is that we encourage our speakers to present in their native language or language of choice. So we’ve had sessions in German, Spanish, and Italian. This brings a new element to the celebration. The presentation is different; the audience is different; the chat room is transformed. Another cool thing that has happened is the integration of the Podcast Awards ceremony during the live stream.

What is something unexpected that’s occurred?

When we started this in 2014, we never expected the celebration and event to make national or international headlines or make the news broadcasts. Yahoo News, CNBC, ESPN, New York Times, T-Mobile, and several local news outlets have written or broadcasted about the event. What started as a 6-hour event in the United States has turned into a 30+ hour event with international representation. A major unexpected outcome that happened was that #InternationalPodcastDay has trended Number 1 & 2 on Twitter for numbers of hours during the last three celebrations. We never expected that to occur.

How have you changed it up a bit this year?

Every year we try to add countries that have not been represented. Last year we invited podcasters from five African countries. This year we have invited podcasters from India, Philippines, and the United Arab Emirates. The interesting dynamic of inviting Hebah Fisher (UAE-based) is that Google Hangouts on Air (the platform we use to broadcast live) is actually blocked in the UAE. We had no idea. So we are working with her to record her presentation and broadcast it as a recorded video. She will be joining the live chat to respond to questions and comments. This is something new that we never imagined happening. Rather than passing on having the UAE represented, we worked around a solution so the international community could hear the UAE’s voice.

Getting Involved with International Podcast Day, 2018

There is a great list of ideas for how you can get involved with International Podcast Day over on their website. A few quick ideas from them (and one from Blubrry):

  • Use #InternationalPodcastDay to engage with others worldwide talking about the event
  • Grab your mic and camera, ask someone about their favorite podcast. Share the response on social media!
  • Share your favorite podcast with someone (coworker, friend, teammate)
  • Not a podcaster? Become one! It’s easier than you think, especially if you choose Blubrry as your platform. We offer world-class Podcast Hosting, Podcast Stats, extensive customization options, distribution to all the major discovery platforms, and complimentary phone support with real, live humans in our Support center.

How We’re Celebrating International Podcast Day, 2018

We are constantly improving our podcasting solutions. This year, to celebrate International Podcast Day, we’re rolling out a couple cool features to help you personalize your podcast even more.

Introducing Emoji Support for Your Show Notes

Yep. Emojis are coming to Blubrry! They’ve been searchable by Google for a couple years. And now those ubiquitous little images we’ve all begun to use–sometimes even in professional correspondence–will shortly be able to be used in your Show Notes if you are a Blubrry customer. We’ll be rolling it out by 9/30/18.

Link to Specific Time Location in Your Podcast

Have a specific portion of your podcast you want to make sure everyone notices? Now, if you’re a Blubrry customer, you’ll be able to link to a specific time stamp in your podcast. Great for use in show notes or social posts. We’ll be rolling this one out to Blubrry users by 9/30/18.

How are you celebrating International Podcast Day this year? Sound off in the comments or hit us up on Facebook or Twitter.

Please follow and like us:

How to Use Podcast SEO to Grow Your Audience



Podcast SEO | BlubrryPodcast SEO

Podcast SEO can feel overwhelming — you just want to share your stories and point of view with as many listeners as you are able. It can also lead you down some analysis paralysis rabbit holes. In this post we will help you understand what Podcast SEO is, why you might need it, and what some podcast SEO best practices are — all so you can grow your podcast audience. If you really want to nerd out and dig in to SEO in general, be sure to check out the Beginner’s Guide to SEO over on Moz.

What is Podcast SEO?

SEO is short for Search Engine Optimization. It’s a suite of black magic marketing approaches intended to increase the visibility of a website or other web property on a Search Engine Results Page (AKA “SERP”). Google and Apple Podcasts are the two largest as far as podcast discovery is concerned. Ideally, your podcast and/or episodes show up near the top of the search results for things your listeners are interested in. For example when searching for Geek News on Apple Podcasts, Geek News, the podcast Geek News Central from our CEO, Todd Cochrane, is the third result for Podcasts.

Why Do I Need Podcast SEO?

Content may still be king, but being the king of an undiscoverable kingdom isn’t really why you started your podcast, is it? Unlike that baseball movie, if you build it, they will only come if they can find it. There are many ways to build your podcast audience, from advertising, to events to good ol’ fashioned word of mouth. But ensuring your podcast SEO is following best practices is kind of like the old adage “fish where the fish are:” your podcast is the bait & hook and podcast SEO helps you cast that fishing line right into the middle of all those searches. So if you want a long-term marketing solution that will help bring an audience to your podcast, you need good SEO.

How to Grow Your Podcast with SEO

You’ve got a podcast, or are about to launch one, and you’re wondering how to grow your podcast audience. No big deal, right? The good news is that podcast listenership is projected to grow at 15-20% per year for the next several years. The bad news is that because of the increasing popularity of podcasts and podcasting, there is a constant flood of new content. Cutting through that clutter to build an audience for your podcast is increasingly difficult. But it’s not impossible. And one of the most effective, long-term tools in your arsenal is to set your podcast up for SEO love.

Podcast SEO Best Practices

Optimizing your podcast for discovery follows a lot of the same technical factors that traditional SEO does. Which means that if you keep your audience’s interests–and how you can genuinely help them discover fascinating content that answers the question(s) they type into that search box–front and center, it’s pretty hard to go wrong.

Here are some podcast SEO best practices:

  1. Humans beat crawlers in the long term: always write your titles, descriptions, and notes in way that answer a specific question an audience might have. Trying to game the system might get you clicks initially, but those audience members will quickly abandon your show if it’s not answering their questions.
  2. Put the keywords as close to the beginning of your title, description, and notes as possible. Remember that fishing analogy? Well, just like goldfish, audiences have short attention spans. Make sure you show them, right up front, that your show can help them.
  3. Use the right tools. Version 6.0 of PowerPress has some truly fantastic SEO tools built right in. There’s a great (short) article about using the podcast SEO tools built in to PowerPress over at Blubrry.com.
  4. Social media engagement has a direct correlation with search rankings. The more people engage with your podcast on the various social platforms, the more search engines like Google see you as a reputable source for your key topics/keywords.
  5. There’s more to SEO than just keywords. Design and user experience on your website and even podcast artwork play a role as well. If someone searches, clicks your link on the SERP, but then immediately leaves your site or stops your podcast, the search engines don’t like that. Their assumption is that the searcher did not find the answer to their question with you, so the search engines might not rank you as highly for those keywords anymore. But, what if you really did have great content in that podcast, it was just really hard for the searcher to find it because of how your website is designed? That’s a bad user experience design problem. Great news is that there are a bazillion website builder tools out there. Blubrry offers PowerPress Sites, the most comprehensive, customizable podcast package available.

Now you know what podcast SEO is, why you might need it, and some podcast SEO best practices. There are, obviously, plenty more you could do to improve your podcast discovery and increase your audience via SEO. We’d love to chat–hit us up on Twitter, Facebook, or if you’re a Blubrry customer reach out to one of our real, live, actual human beings in Blubrry Support.

Please follow and like us:

What Is A Podcast RSS Feed?



RSS feeds aren’t exactly user friendly to all, so we wanted to simplify them a bit so that everyone can understand. We explain not only what a podcast feed is but the importance of having one.

What is a podcast RSS feed anyway?

RSS stands for “Rich Site Syndication” or “Really Simple Syndication”. In short, according to Wikipedia, RSS “is a type of web feed which allows users to access updates to online content in a standardized, computer-readable format.” In human language, that means you and your audience can use an RSS feed to consume your content someplace other than your website. Remember blog aggregators/readers? That’s how they work(ed). And, if you have a podcast, the podcast RSS feed is how platforms like Apple Podcasts, Google Podcast, Spotify, and others get your podcast info: they are more like an old-school phonebook, in that they simply list your information, but your podcast is actually served from wherever you host your media files. Your podcast RSS feed tells them things like your show name, the podcast episode title, the duration, etc. By the way, if you’re looking for an incredibly flexible, fast, stable place to host your podcast media files, be sure to check out our Podcast Hosting plans. Or, if you’re wondering how to get your podcast on Apple Podcasts, check out our step by step guide.

Why you need a podcast RSS feed

Put yourself in your listener’s shoes… or eyes & ears… for a minute. When you post anything to your website, your RSS feed defaults to listing a certain number of your most recent items. For example, WordPress defaults to listing the 10 most recent posts. The thing is, podcast readers will ignore anything in the default RSS feed that isn’t a podcast. So, if you’re publishing a handful of blog posts per month as well as a podcast per week, your default feed will only serve up those four podcasts. Your listeners are missing out.

BUT! If you have a podcast-only RSS feed as Blubrry users do, your listeners will have access to more of your awesomeness because the feed won’t be filled up with blog post content. Just the podcasts. You should have a podcast-only RSS feed.

Three ways to create a podcast RSS feed

Something to seriously consider as you set out on your epic podcasting journey: do you want to own and control your podcast RSS feed? The answer, if you truly care about your own story, is most likely yes. In which case, read on.

  1. The PowerPress WordPress plugin. It’s free. It’s super simple. It’s one of the most trusted ways to share your story with the world. The PowerPress WordPress plugin makes creating your podcast RSS feed ridiculously easy. That’s why there are tens of thousands of active installs, all over the world. We began developing the PowerPress WordPress plugin way back in 2008 because we wanted an easier way to create a podcast RSS feeds for our own podcasts. There is even a step-by-step guide on how to create your podcast RSS feed over at Blubrry.com.
  2. If you don’t have a WordPress site we provide one to every customer for free and it has PowerPress included. There certainly are a plethora of other options, but none are as simple to use or widely adopted and it’s integrated into the free WordPress site for those that do not have one.
  3. There is no three.

Ok. Those are the basics of what a podcast RSS feed is, why you might want one, and how to set up your very own podcast RSS feed. Be sure to check back often for more podcast RSS tips and tricks. And, as always, if you’re a Blubrry customer and you have any questions at all, give us a call. We have real, live humans ready, willing and able to help you build your podcast– including technical support in setting up a podcast RSS feed.

We should also mention that sometimes our corporate customers or podcasters experimenting in the space do not want to go the WordPress route. That’s really ok as we have a solution for you where you can publish directly on Blubrry.com as well and we will provide you an RSS feed from there. We always want to suggest the best solutions first, as we truly believe you should build your brand on your .com this results in the best SEO for your show.

Please follow and like us:

Podcast Hosting Options and Your Content



Podcasters have lots of options today when it comes to hosting, which is really incredible considering how things were when Blubrry launched back in 2005. Having been in the space that long gives us a lot of perspective on the ease of which podcasters today can get their message out to the world versus how much more difficult it was five or ten years ago. If you hang out with any of our team members or listen to our podcast, you will quickly learn that we are podcasters first and foremost and very attuned to creator rights in regards to their content.

At Blubrry, we’re committed to providing top-notch services to podcasters. The products and services we provide allow those that use our services to launch their podcast in a way that allows them to control their brand, intellectual property, and of course their podcast feed. We are confident that, three or six months down the road, podcasters who sign on with our services will feel great about the choice they made to work with a company that respects those rights and makes it easy to retain ownership and control of their intellectual property.

By contrast, today we often get calls from podcasters who have realized they made some podcast service provider selection missteps when they launched their shows.

These run the full gambit, but for most, it’s the realization that they are building their show/brand on top of rented land and that they would much rather be promoting their own .com versus promoting the brand or vertical their show is on. With Google, today entering the scene with Google Podcasts the value of building your SEO for your own site is much more appealing than building the SEO of your host.

Today, podcasting is big business, with many models to choose from. While a few of our offerings are free, notably the PowerPress Plugin & basic Podcast Stats, most of our products and services – like hosting and pro stats – have subscription costs. While some podcast offerings out there today are attempting to forge new business models, our perspective in the space requires us to consider creators first and not risk our customers’ shows with business models we have seen come and go.

“Podcasting companies are more than a place to host your media,” explains Blubrry/RawVoice CEO Todd Cochrane. “At Blubrry, we have a diverse team that is involved in support, development, monetization and podcaster advocacy. We work behind the scenes with groups such as the IAB to make sure your podcast stats are IAB compliant. At the same time, we consistently maintain and update our infrastructure and continue to develop new and existing services.”

All this requires time, resources, and yes money – so if a company is providing you a service and not charging you for it, their business model necessitates generating significant revenue to pay salaries, benefits, infrastructure, rent and more. In that circumstance, the value you’re “trading” them is often not well defined, but may include access to and control of your content. We would argue that your content is far more valuable than what we charge you to host it and is, in fact, too valuable to trade away for access to “free” services.

A free podcast host might be a good fit for you if you’re testing out podcasting. However, keep in mind that a free service may restrict your ability to monetize your podcast yourself. You may not be able to access your own analytics, and if your host owns your feed, they may also insert their own ads or even remove your show without warning. The more control you give up of your content and where it lives, the more likely a change to the company’s business model or terms of service will negatively affect you.

At Blubrry we start with the simple premise that there are many benefits to podcasters owning and controlling their intellectual property, and we are committed to creating products and services that allow you to grow your show without our interference. It may not be free, but for those of us serious about building our brands, the cost is well worth paying.

Please follow and like us:

Happy 10th Birthday, PowerPress!



PowerPress Plugin

From its modest beginning on August 11, 2008, through the dozens of updates that led to its feature-packed modern incarnation, the PowerPress Plugin was born from a desire to help the podcasting community – and that commitment is just as strong today.

When a popular WordPress-based podcast plugin went under in 2007, the team at Blubrry saw the impact it was having on podcasters, and sprung into action to create a solution – and the rest is history.

Among many, many other changes and improvements, the 10-year history of PowerPress has included:

Some things, however, have never changed. The PowerPress plugin continues to be free, and is still cared for by its original developer, Blubrry CIO Angelo Mandato (for more on the history and future of PowerPress, listen to the most recent episode of the PowerPress Podcast.) Now powering between 60,000 and 80,000 podcasts, PowerPress remains stable and forward-thinking: ready to handle a continuing increase of listeners and imminent new technology like implementation into vehicles.

Happy birthday, PowerPress! We’re excited to watch you continue to power podcasts for the next decade and beyond.

 

Please follow and like us:

Cardioid, Omnidirectional, Dynamic, Condenser: What Kind Of Mic Is Best For Podcasting?



Whether you’re just getting started podcasting or ready to upgrade your equipment, choosing a mic can be one of the most confusing decisions you make. There are a ton of options out there, and podcasters have some very definite opinions about which microphones are best…but first, you have to make two choices.

Cardioid Vs. Omnidirectional: 

A cardioid or hypercardioid microphone (like the Audio Technica AR-2100 or RØDE Podcaster) records from a specific area of the mic, while an omnidirectional mic picks up sound equally from all areas of the mic.

“For podcasting, you’re basically always going to want a cardioid or hypercardioid microphone,” says Brian Thomas, audio engineer and owner of Yōkai Audio. “The polar pattern of a cardioid microphone allows you to focus on the sound you want, like your voice, while minimizing the sounds you don’t want – i.e., everything else.” (For more information on how to use your microphone’s polar pattern to your advantage, check out this thorough article.)

Cardioid/hypercardioid mics are usually the better choice for podcasters for a couple of reasons, says Thomas.

First, very few podcasters are able to record in ideal conditions. “Cardioid/hypercardioid mics allow you use the microphone’s “dead spot” at the back of the capsule to minimize unwanted noise,” says Thomas. “If you have a loud heating duct or rumbly refrigerator, you can point the back of your microphone at it and significantly reduce its presence on your recording.”

Second, if you’re recording multiple people in the same room, you’ll want to be able to isolate your signals as much as possible. “You can point two cardioid mics 180 degrees away from each other and use the dead spots at the back of the capsule to minimize bleed between the microphones,” suggests Thomas.

There may be circumstances in which an omnidirectional microphone is the better choice for a podcaster – for example, if you’re recording on location, and the background noise is an important part of the podcast’s ambiance. And some podcasters use omnidirectional mics to capture the voices of several people at once into a single mic. Beware, though, that since a single mic is capturing the sound, there won’t be a way to separate those voices later to level them out or make isolated adjustments. For all these reasons, Thomas highly recommends recording each individual on their own cardioid mic.

Dynamic Vs. Condenser:

The choice between dynamic and condenser microphones is mostly one of personal preference, but you’ll want to keep a few things in mind. First, condensers are generally more sensitive than dynamic mics, which means you’ll get a crisper, more detailed sound. But, that also makes condensers more prone to picking up background noises you don’t necessarily want (remember what we said earlier about refrigerators, air conditioners and the other less-than-ideal realities home podcasters dal with?) and may also exaggerate lip smacking, breathing and other sounds you’d rather didn’t come across on your recording.  Condenser mics also require an external power source. That said, many podcasters successfully use condenser mics and prefer them to dynamic; just keep in mind your recording location and other factors when choosing.

The absolute best way to choose a mic, suggests Thomas, is to head to a local retailer and try them for yourself. If that’s not realistic, ask around: forums, blog posts and Amazon reviews are a great way to find out which mics are favorites of other podcasters…and why.

Please follow and like us:

One Surprising Thing Podcasters Can Learn From Alex Jones and InfoWars



Earlier this week, Apple made big news when the company, citing hate speech, removed 5 of the 6 podcasts hosted by Alex Jones of InfoWars.com. 

What you may not know is that, when podcasts are removed from the Apple Podcast Directory, they also automatically disappear from many other apps. That’s because most podcast apps are powered by the Apple Podcast Directory via an Apple-controlled API. This means that the app owners don’t have to make difficult decisions about content – but it also means that they don’t have the ability to individually control the way podcasts appear on their app, or whether they appear at all.

Apple does it essentially by proxy: because these apps largely do not have their own infrastructure to maintain a master list of shows, what you end up with is one entity controlling 95% of all master show listings across both iOS and Android.

But while Jones’ podcasts have disappeared from most podcast apps, the show can still be found. That’s because Alex Jones actually made one smart move: he controlled his RSS feed right from the start.

“It’s always the extreme cases that bring out the true power of RSS,” says Todd Cochrane, CEO of Blubrry/Rawvoice. “We advocate podcasts controlling their RSS feeds for many reasons, and this kind of event just highlights that necessity. InfoWars is an extreme show, but like it or not, it’s still on the air because they control their own RSS feed.” If their hosting provider had controlled their RSS feed like thousands of shows today they would be off the air.

Sure, most podcasters don’t have such controversial shows that we’d ever have to worry about an outright ban from Apple. But any time your show is completely controlled by another entity – such as a podcast host that owns or controls your feed or Apple Podcasts account – you’re ultimately at their mercy. A change to their platform technology, algorithms, or business model, and who knows what could happen to your show?

But by owning your feed and Apple Podcasts listing, at least you can ultimately control your own content and make a Plan B as the podcasting landscape continues to evolve.

Please follow and like us: