All posts by Blubrry

How To Make The Most Of Your Sponsored Spots



A few weeks ago we discussed choosing the best placement for advertisements in your podcasts. But of course, there’s a lot more to a successful sponsored campaign than where the ad actually lives. In this post we’ve compiled four pro tips to help you nail those sponsored ads.

1) Make It Personal.

“The power of podcast advertising is the power of the endorsement,” explains Heather Osgood, CEO of True Native Media, an agency that connects podcasters with advertisers. “The best scenario is a live endorsement ad,” in which the host talks about his or her personal experience with the product or service. Osgood admits, however, that it’s not always possible or practical to personally experience every sponsor’s goods. “If the product or service can’t be sampled by a host, then a live-read ad is best,” she says. As for canned (pre-produced) ads? “True Native Media has not run any canned ads to date,” Osgood says. “Canned ads would only make sense if the ad were dynamically inserted across a number of different podcasts.”

2) Go Above and Beyond.

If you’re working with an advertising network, anything you offer on top of your endorsement or ad might not lead to more dollars…right away, at least. “Most advertisers are thrilled to receive posts on social platforms, but they are not typically interested in paying additional for that reach,” explains Osgood. But that doesn’t mean that going the extra mile won’t pay back in the future. If you’re selling your own sponsor spots and have a decent social media reach, you may be able to interest an advertiser in an integrated campaign that incorporates your podcast, show notes post, website banner ads, and/or social media amplification. And at the very least, giving a little extra effort to your current sponsors might make them more eager to work with you in the future. “I think an effective podcast sponsorship is a three-pronged strategy: banners, text mention in show notes with a hyperlink, plus the host-endorsed spot, followed up with at least 1 weekly social mention with proper disclosure (#ad or #spon),” says Todd Cochrane, CEO of Blubrry. “That way the listener ideally hears the ad, sees the banner, and reads the ad in the show notes, and it’s reinforced with the social reminder.” And if your ad is an affiliate, going the extra mile to promote the brand carefully will net you larger sales.

Bottom line: you have a platform, so why not use it to its fullest extent?

3) Package Thoughtfully. 

While your network may offer you ads that require only a midroll placement, it never hurts to quickly remind your listeners about the sponsor at the end of the show. And briefly teasing the sponsor at the beginning of the show may also help the message stick. “The ideal sponsorship package will include a quick preroll thank you to the sponsor, a midroll 60-second ad, and an endroll thank you,” says Cochrane.

 4) Think About Your Audience First.

Remember that all of the above are only guidelines, and sometimes rules are made to be broken. Maybe the tone of your particular show lends itself more to a snarky review or parody than an earnest endorsement. Maybe your show is so engrossing that a midroll break would be jarring, or so quick-moving that 60 seconds would seem like an eternity. And just because every other podcaster in the world seems to be working with a particular brand, ask yourself: is YOUR particular audience likely to be interested in Casper mattresses or a plug for Squarespace? When done thoughtfully, podcast advertising can offer the best of all worlds: honest and helpful information, presented in an authentic and appealing way, which also happens to earn you money! If you aren’t sure what kinds of products or services your audience might like, survey them to find out. And remember: focusing on adding value for your audience before anything else is the most surefire way to find success with sponsorship.
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Turn-Key Podcasting Solution PowerPress Sites Deluxe Is Now Available



Blubrry has long been committed to simplifying the technical side of podcasting so that podcasters can focus on creating excellent content.

With the release of PowerPress Sites Deluxe, podcasting has never been so easy.

Deluxe is a second tier of service for PowerPress Sites, which launched its Basic level in June. The turnkey solution includes hosting, statistics, and a managed WordPress website, as well as an expanded selection of templates, themes, and plugins. Most importantly, PowerPress Sites Deluxe offers the ability for podcasters to use their own domains, (purchased separately,) for their website.

“All of our PowerPress Site options are highly optimized to be blazing fast, and managed by a professional team that keeps the sites secure, backed up, and regularly updated, allowing the content creator to focus on creating content,” says Angelo Mandato, CIO of Blubrry.

“Our goal with PowerPress Sites is to allow a podcaster to scale features to their websites as their show grows. The Basic tier is designed for a new podcaster launching a show, and the Deluxe tier is for podcasters that want to establish their brand, and build SEO and social awareness to their website, via their own dot com,” says Todd Cochrane, CEO of Blubrry.

Blubrry is the only podcasting company to bring a product to market that will scale and grow with the podcaster, as their show and audience evolves. Podcasters can look forward to two higher tiers of service, which will provide podcasters with greater flexibility to build networks and host multiple shows. They’ll also offer additional features, security measurements, and sophisticated customization capabilities. Podcasters with a community of any size can use PowerPress Sites.

As with any Blubrry product, purchase includes free world-class phone support, so you won’t have to worry about the learning curve. We’re here to help you get things off the ground because our goal is your success. Check out the PowerPress Sites plans, and if you have questions, leave us a comment below!

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Midroll Vs Preroll: What’s The Best Place For Podcast Advertising?



For podcasters putting together their own media kits and trying to stab-in-the-dark at rates, it can be confusing figuring how to put a value on different advertising placements. There is a common idea, for example, that most shows aren’t listened to all the way through, which would affect the value of placement later in a show. But that perception is simply wrong, says Todd Cochrane, CEO of Blubrry.

“We know from survey info that, if executed in the first 25% of a show, an ad will have an extremely high chance of being heard,” says Cochrane. “When planning campaigns we look at up to 3 months’ worth of show download trends to see where an audience is in predicting download totals. The percentage of download data we see in our enterprise podcast statistics reporting makes very clear a high percentage of listeners get past the 25% mark.”

And even spots that air a bit later fare well. Going by Blubrry/Rawvoice’s robust statistics, 85% of the time when someone initiates listening to a podcast episode, it is ultimately 75% – 100% downloaded. While there is a 10% margin of error, that’s still a pretty great indicator that most shows are being listened to all the way to the end – or at least, very close.

So knowing that a listener is likely to hear an ad whether it’s placed at the beginning or end of a program, does it matter where the spot appears? The answer is “maybe.”

Heather Osgood, CEO of True Native Media, which connects advertisers with podcasts of all sizes, says that sponsors tend to prefer midroll placement – defined as occurring somewhere within the middle 50% of a program, or at least 25% from either end. “The listener is typically engaged in an activity and won’t get out their phone to forward through the ad,” she explains. “Pricing for midroll is typically the highest priced ad spot within a program, while endroll spots are the least desirable because someone can easily turn off the episode and doesn’t have any incentive to listen to an ad at the end of the program.”

That said, just because a listener hears an ad or hasn’t shut off an episode yet, that doesn’t necessarily mean he or she is paying attention. And it’s hard to find data that draws a clear correlation between the placement of an ad and how likely the audience is to engage with the sponsor or make a purchase.

That’s the bad news. The good news? Right now, many advertisers overall don’t seem too concerned about placement, and may not be tracking conversions at all.  “I have not found that the average advertiser cares much about placement as long as it isn’t at the end of the show,” says Osgood. “I have not to date had an advertiser request a lower rate based on placement, nor have I had an advertiser refuse to advertiser when their desired placement is not met.” She also mentions that engagement and conversions, while a nice bonus, aren’t typically the advertiser’s concern. “Downloads are king when it comes to advertiser interest,” she says.

That doesn’t mean that smaller podcasts should despair, however. “We find that very niche podcasts, while harder to sell, command a higher cost per spot,” says Osgood, pointing out that True Native Media represents shows that have as few as 2,000 downloads per episode within a 30-day period, but that shows that receive 10,000+ find greater success with advertisers.

And regardless of whether sponsors are paying attention right now, it makes sense to ensure that your listeners are truly engaging with your ads. As advertisers become more savvy, they are likely to continue to ask more of podcasters by way of detailed podcast statistics and proving engagement and conversions. Also, keep in mind that if your show commands a loyal audience, you may do very well with affiliate marketing regardless the size of that audience – but while a sponsor might not be too worried about where that spot appears, placement could make a big difference to the success of an affiliate campaign.

No matter what, it’s wise to make sure your audience is engaging with all of your content – including the sponsored parts – to ensure continued growth and a satisfied, loyal listenership.

 

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4 Steps Newbie Podcasters Should Follow For The Best Possible Launch



On the blog last week, we discussed RSS feed best practices. But while that post contained great advice for intermediate to advancd podcasters, newbies may want to take a few minutes to understand just exactly what happens when they publish an episode to make sure they aren’t missing opportunities to get their show in front of the largest possible audience.

Here are our best tips from Blubrry CEO Todd Cochrane:

  1. Subscribe to your own show. “If you’ve done that, you can save yourself some pain and embarrassment by checking to see if your show episode shows up in your favorite podcast app,” says Cochrane.
  2. If you haven’t done #1 and you load the podcast listings in iTunes, Stitcher, or any other app to realize that your latest episode isn’t there, keep this in mind: those sites periodically check your show listing and update it. If you’re lucky, that happens within a few hours, but if you publish infrequently it may be up to 24 hours before the episode shows up.
  3. When you subscribe to your own show, most apps actually subscribe you to your feed that you initially submitted to iTunes, Google, Stitcher, Blubrry etc. So while your subscription will update immediately, the other sites will get around to you at some point. Today the Apple Podcasts directory is pulling 325,000 feeds every 3-4 hours, and sometimes they get behind.
  4. It’s really important that you keep your image art in compliance in both image pixel size and in keeping the image smaller than 500k in size. Not doing so will handicap your show’s ability to be updated. Note: your ID3 Album art does not need to be the same spec as the Apple show art. The larger the physical size of the album art embedded in your mp3, the longer it takes your podcast to start playing, explains Cochrane. “All of my episode art is 600×600 .jpg and under 100k, plus the smaller episode art saves you space with your hosting plans.”

It really comes down to some proactive management to keep your show thriving and your anxiety level low.

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C’est Cool! Blubrry/Rawvoice Featured In French TV Special



Très bien! Earlier this year, the French cable TV channel Cable Plus produced a program on podcasting – and naturellement, Blubrry staff were asked to appear on the program as experts in the industry. At the 5:28 mark, MacKenzie Bennett, Services and Affiliates Coordinator at Blubrry, describes how Blubrry/Rawvoice provides statistics and demographics information and why they are so crucial for monetizing a podcast – and her interview is dubbed over in French, bien sûr.

Watch this well-produced programme below!

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The Genesis of Blubrry’s “Own Your Own Podcast Feed” Credo



Here at Blubrry, we have a long history of encouraging podcasters to retain control of their own feed. Simply put, that means that your feed should look something like yoururl.com/feed – NOT yourpodcastservice.com/yourpodcastservice.xml.

Controlling your own podcast feed allows you to take it with you easily should you decide to change podcast service providers, and also protects you against outages or other problems that might occur with your feed provider.

But some might wonder how and why Blubrry arrived at this approach when other companies in the podcast services community advocate controlling the podcasters feed. Following is Blubrry CEO Todd Cochrane’s story, explaining why he took and Blubrry adopted the philosophy of Your Show, Your Brand, Your feed.

“In October of 2004. when I launched my show, I was using MovableType. There were some hacks used to get the feed podcast-compliant. At the time, it truly was a technical challenge, and a lot of folks across a variety of systems were hand-writing their feeds or using rudimentary software tools. In mid-2005, around the same time that Apple opened up Podcast support on iTunes, the folks at FeedBurner – which had been around since 2003 – updated their service to support all of the newly announced iTunes tags.”

Podcasters who didn’t have an easy way to implement those tags or create their own feed ran to Feedburner, says Cochrane. After all, it was an easy fix to what was, at the time, a difficult problem.

But “The geek in me screamed “No!” because, at the time, podcatcher software applications – which are largely extinct today – ruled the roost as the top podcast download and consumption tool,” explains Cochrane. “This was in the iPod days – no iPhone – so in our shows, we promoted our RSS feed in every episode as a primary way to subscribe. Promoting geeknewscentral.com/podcast.xml was a lot easier than promoting Feedburner as the place to sign up for my show. Everyone was very sensitive to their feeds, as a lot of directories launched then and made the mistake of not including shows’ sources feeds in the directory listings, which they often had to quickly correct as the outcry of podcasters was fierce.”

But all the while, Cochrane was producing his show and building his brand while growing a dedicated following around his site where he also fed listeners extra content including daily blog posts and special content surrounding events he attended. So it made no sense, he realized, to hand over his brand to a totally different company that could potentially dilute his brand or possibly control or cause delays in content delivery, like what happens today on FeedBurner.

And sometimes, putting your feed in another company’s control can lead to unexpected consequences. “When we launched RawVoice/Blubrry, and then later PowerPress, we had already witnessed podcast services going out of business and the podcasts that relied on their services, leaving podcasters and their audiences high and dry. I told our team that no matter what, we never want to put any of the users that use our tools or services in that position.”

As a result, the company has built a menu of services and products that allow a podcaster to build their podcast and brand as well as control their feed to exist and thrive independent of Blubrry. “Today Blubrry could cease to exist, and folks that use our tools would only need to find new hosting and stats,” explains Cochrane. “Customers would never lose their show, brand, feed, or audience.”

“It is a core part of the philosophy of this company that we fundamentally believe a podcaster should own and control his own intellectual property. This includes a .com, site, feed, brand, etc. Sure we have some customers that use a Bubrry.com provided RSS feed for their show, but that is less than 1% of our business and usually only when they have very special publishing needs. 99% of our customers own their stack and rely on our tools to power it. We believe if we are providing superior tools, service, and support that we will be rewarded with subscribers using our services.”

Recently, says Cochrane, a few naysayers in the podcasting community have asserted that Blubrry is trying to scare folks into using their own feeds. That’s not true, he asserts. “Our company fundamental beliefs is the genesis of how we developed this philosophy. With 65,000+ podcasters using PowerPress alone we know that our message resonates with a lot of creators out theirs. Podcasters need to weigh their options before launching a show, and if they decide to take control of their brand after launching with another service, we are here to help them.”

While Cochrane realizes he has a fundamental difference in philosophy from other podcast service companies, he believes Blubrry still offers the best possible services and products for those in the podcasting community. “I think our philosophy is a best practice for podcasters. While other services out there are doing interesting things, as a podcaster, first I want to make sure I control my stack top to bottom and use cool tools I so choose and not be limited by any service provider.”

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Radio Professionals: Learn From Blubrry CEO Todd Cochrane at NAB Show 2017



The annual NAB Show, where professionals in the fields of media, entertainment, and technology learn, network, and expand their skills, returns April 22 – 27, 2017 at the Las Vegas Convention Center. This year Blubrry CEO Todd Cochrane will speak on a panel specially geared toward radio professionals, helping them make the best success of their podcasting efforts.

The panel will help radio professionals create more effective and profitable podcasting programs, answering questions like:

  • How do 2017 podcast download numbers compare to previous years, and what might this mean for radio stations?
  • What is the download reach of the top podcasts in iTunes?
  • How have the IAB’s new podcast metric guidelines impacted podcasts?
  • What are the different platform, OS and device distribution shares?
  • What current trends in podcasting will continue to grow?
  • How can radio benefit from podcasting?

The panel “will also give radio professional insights into how their peers are leveraging the talent within their stations to create the content that they do so well, to build new revenue streams and reach audiences that have shifted to digital media consumption,” explains Cochrane.

There will be an open Q&A to round out the session, so be sure to come prepared with questions.

The session will take place Wednesday, April 26 from 10:30 AM – 11:30 AM in room N253. For more information on the session, click here. Or, take this opportunity to register for the NABShow.

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Is “New and Noteworthy” Really The Podcaster’s Pot of Gold?



For many new podcasters, getting added to iTunes’ “New and Noteworthy” section is the Holy Grail. While there is a lot of conjecture about the exact number of downloads and reviews a new podcast needs to amass in the first few weeks after launch to make it to the N&N list, mysterious strategies seem to have allowed shows with less than 100 downloads and just a couple of reviews to make it onto the list. The mystery surrounding the New and Noteworthy list seems to hold new podcasters hostage, with marketers selling “guaranteed” strategies to land a show on the list and podcasters feeling like failures if they don’t make it.

But are there any tried-and-true strategies for landing on the N&N list? And how important is it, anyway?

How It (Really) Works:

All podcasts that exist in the iTunes directory wind up in the “new” part of New and Noteworthy, explains Angelo Mandato, CIO of Blubrry. “There are about 10 thousand rotated through that section, and they’re ranked based on download and play popularity on iTunes itself.” But while “they say” you can stay in the “new” section for 8 weeks, he explains, the truth is a little trickier. “There are 1,200-2,400 shows added each week to iTunes, and they rotate through. So if it’s been 5 weeks and 1,200 shows were added each week, you’ll still be in the new list – but if they added 2,400 each week, your show rolls off New and Noteworthy sooner. It’s not set by time, but how many shows are added at a given time.” That means that if your podcast’s category happens to be seeing a lot of action right now, the chances of your show making it to the top of the list or staying on it the full 8 weeks will go down.

And when it comes to the Noteworthy part of N&N, Mandato explains, it’s out of your hands. “Podcasts in the “Noteworthy” part of New and Noteworthy are hand-picked by Apple staff, and you cannot influence that,” he says. “For example, around the Stanley Cup playoffs, Apple staff may pick 2-3 hockey podcasts to appear in New and Noteworthy.” Of course, putting out a high-quality, consistent show will make it much more likely your show will catch Apple’s eye. And there are other strategies you can employ, says Mandato, such as having a few episodes already published when you launch and then promoting hard so you can raise your show’s visibility. But there’s no “formula” that can ensure that your show appears in the Noteworthy section – it’s more about overall cachet and timing.

Why New and Noteworthy’s Prominence Is Dying Down

While newbie podcasters still covet that prized N&N recognition, Mandato points out that changes in the way podcasts are consumed has greatly reduced its overall effect. “In the iTunes desktop, the New and Noteworthy section was the first thing someone would see when navigating into the podcast portion of the app. That’s why in the past it was rather fortunate to be in the top of New and Noteworthy in particular categories,” he explains. “Today, though, the mobile app has the bulk of podcast consumption, and the mobile podcast iOS app does not display New and Noteworthy unless the user navigates into it. Usually folks navigate into the search or directly into their current subscriptions.”

The Bottom Line

When it comes right down to it, your podcast’s success will be determined much more by long-term effort than any get-big-quick schemes. “Getting on the New and Noteworthy list is great for ego, but there’s very little – if any – long term-gain, in my opinion,” says Todd Cochrane, CEO of Blubrry.

So what’s an ambitious new podcaster to do? While getting on the N&N list might be a nice temporary boost, publishing a quality show, doing plenty of listener outreach, and being consistent and patient will yield much better results over the long haul.

And just as importantly, don’t forget that iTunes is in itself a search engine. “Users rely heavily on searching for podcasts, so it’s important that you have a search strategy for your podcast,” says Mandato. It’s important to note that web SEO and podcast SEO are two very different things, and that using the free PowerPress plugin will help you maximize both.

So there’s the bottom line. Focus on quality, publish consistently, and put the bulk of your efforts into strategies that will help you over the long haul. That way, if you land on the New and Noteworthy list, it’ll be just a nice perk – not your show’s make-or-break strategy.

 

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PowerPress Tops 1 Million Downloads!



Here at Blubrry, we’re pretty proud of PowerPress, the FREE podcast publishing tool that powers more podcasts worldwide than any other plugin. But now we really have something to celebrate: On March 10, PowerPress surpassed 1 million downloads, pulling even further ahead of the pack when it comes to podcast management and distribution.

“PowerPress was created by Blubrry to fill a void,” explained Todd Cochrane, CEO. “The WordPress podcasting plugins at the time were plagued with compatibility issues and poor support.” The plugin was launched in 2008 and quickly became the most popular plugin on the market. “The industry’s response was phenomenal,” says Cochrane. Approximately 18 percent of all podcasts found on iTunes use PowerPress, more than any other service or platform, and the plugin now powers more than 65,000 podcast websites ranging from single podcasts to radio stations and podcast networks, the biggest having over 600 shows on a single install.

There are many reasons PowerPress has been downloaded 6X as much as any other podcasting plugin, but perhaps most important is the ease of use and all-in-one experience it allows.

“PowerPress allows individuals to manage podcasts directly from their WordPress website,” explained Angelo Mandato, CIO of Blubrry and the main developer of PowerPress. “By combining the website experience with your podcast, podcasters can leverage the synergy created between web visitors and podcast subscribers. With more than 100 iTunes compliant features, users can manage multiple podcasts in both audio and/or video.”

For thousands of podcasters, PowerPress has served as a free, easy-to-use introduction to the top-notch services Blubrry provides. But the real magic happens when PowerPress is used in tandem with other Blubrry products, such as hosting and professional podcast stats. The products work seamlessly together, allowing podcasters to create, publish, and distribute their podcasts – plus share new episodes on social media and check analytics – all without leaving their WordPress dashboard. And we don’t stop with creating great products: we’re here to help you every step of the way, with free podcasting tutorials and top-notch customer service. 

If you haven’t tried PowerPress, now’s the time to discover how easy and streamlined podcasting can really be! And if you’re one of the million-plus who’ve already downloaded the plugin, we’d love to hear what you think.

Leave us a comment below: what do you love about PowerPress? Why do you think it’s the most popular podcasting tool?

 

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5 Reasons Radio Professionals LOVE Blubrry



The best talent and minds in the radio industry can boast a strong understanding of a century-old medium. But while radio professionals see the huge potential in podcasting – both as an additional revenue source as well as an opportunity to build stronger brands by delivering on-demand content – it isn’t always easy to for a mass media company to launch a podcasting program.

Luckily, Blubrry has a solution for that.

“We are a small media market within a medium media market,” says Zack East, Digital Media Manager for Midwest Family Broadcasting in Benton Harbor, MI,  “Our consumers are thirsty for local content, swimming in a sea of out-of-state and corporate television and print.” Still, while management understood the value of podcasting, rolling out an organized effort to begin producing podcasts proved difficult until the company discovered Blubrry’s all-in-one solutions.

Here, East shares the five things he most appreciates about being a Professional level Blubrry hosting customer. 

Ease of Use:

While most of the company’s on-air talent was already producing some podcasts, the popular service they were using was cumbersome and required a lot of extra effort from the already-busy staff. After switching to Blubrry, he says, “we spoke with our staffs across six radio stations and explained how they never have to insert code again, that they could do everything in one step inside their station’s WordPress website, that they didn’t have to deal with more usernames and passwords, and that their podcasts will show up among their station’s blog posts,” explains East. “Needless to say, it went really well! And, as we all know, if it’s easy to do, there’s less chance someone will ‘forget’ to get it done.”

Accessibility for Listeners:

Ease of use for the listener is also key, says East. “I am a big believer in accessibility. The more accessible material is to the consumer, the better chance they’ll give it a listen.” Blubrry’s Subscribe on Android feature was a particular hit with the staff, many of whom use Android devices and had found the process of subscribing to podcasts time-consuming. Blubrry’s attractive, innovative media player was also well-received as a great way to introduce less technologically-oriented listeners to the world of podcasts.

A Streamlined Solution:

With six radio stations housed under one roof and a lean management team, there isn’t always a lot of time to individually coach each on-air personality through a lengthy process of publishing, promoting, and sharing podcasts. That’s why Blubrry’s suite of complementary services was such a breath of fresh air to East and his team. “This idea of keeping podcast content and stories or blogs all in one place is just magical. Who would have thought that we could easily marry a lot of tech together with such little effort? And, if we are able to explain to our listeners that EVERYTHING you hear on the air – the stories we talk about, the songs we play, the chance to see our social media or listen live, can all be found at the same website – they’ll be more likely to use us and come back,” he says.

More Opportunities To Monetize Content:

Of course, any media company’s primary goal is to be profitable, so a podcast program has to promise more than just personal satisfaction. East is finding that the “easy button” nature of Blubrry’s services has made it much easier to define the benefits and potential for sales staff and advertisers who may want to sponsor a podcast or even buy a client-focused podcast of their own. And the staff workload is so much less. “We don’t have to create a brand new website just to help them host a podcast either,” he says. One great example is the company’s new Meet the Makers podcast, which focuses on crafters of beer, wine and spirits in the company’s region and was the network’s first client-focused, sponsored podcast, all created using Blubrry’s professional-level hosting services.

World-Class Stats:

In any media buy situation, potential advertisers want to know one thing: how many people are listening, and who are they? Blubrry’s top-notch analytics make it easy for the team at MWFB to determine and communicate those numbers. “When we talked as a radio company about how we could monetize what we produce for our podcasts using our local sales staff, metrics were the number one concern. Most of our stations’ staff had been podcasting using other random services, most of which have no analytics for free. Since our sales staff is used to using our listening and digital infographics to help sell our products and audiences, it was integral that our podcasts also have just as much data. We were ecstatic to find out that Blubrry had data we didn’t think we could track from podcasting – most of it for free,” says East. “And, having data accessible to our airstaff, our clients and our sales people helps all of them justify the time and money spent on these sometimes major projects of producing a great product.”

Here at Blubrry, our focus has always been on handling the technology details so that talent can concentrate on what they’re best at: creating high-quality, compelling content. That goal explains why a small-but-mighty, locally-focused broadcasting company decided to trust Blubrry with its fledgling podcasting program. We believe that other broadcast companies, big and small, could learn something from that kind of forward thinking – and we’ll continue to be here, creating the products and services that fuel their success.

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