How To Make The Most Of Your Blubrry Stats



Blubrry is dedicated to offering the most comprehensive podcast stats around, but we realize that some podcasters may be confused by what seems like information overload. This post will help you make the most of our robust reporting, whether your goal is to attract advertisers, track growth, or spot trends. Here’s a close look at each of the reports you can pull in Blubrry stats, what data each report delivers, and how you can use that information.

History

At the upper left of your Blubrry stats page, you’ll see a History section. Here are the various ways you can view this information:

  • Complete: This is the global picture of what has happened to your show over its life.
  • Monthly: a snapshot of all media consumption on all episodes that have been downloaded or played over the month in question. If an episode gets zero downloads in the reporting month, it will not show up in the report.
  • Range View: Just like it sounds, the range view allows you to choose a specific range of dates. “I find range view useful when looking at advertising reporting,” says Blubrry CEO Todd Cochrane. “I can pull the data for specific episodes over a defined period. It’s also handy to look at performance over specific periods of time.”

 

 

 

Reports:

The Reports section is where the data can get really granular, and may seem the most confusing. Here’s a rundown of each report and what it can tell you:

  • Trending is the day to day trend line. You can look at how your show trends in a global view of the entire show or you can look more closely at a specific month or episode. The reporting tool also allows you to get very granular, looking at how a specific episode has performed over its entire lifetime.”I rely on the trending line a lot,” says Cochrane. “I look for yearly, monthly and weekly trends. The trending report tells me over time if I am on the right track – if I see a dip, I know that I need to examine the show and see why. Was it due to a holiday, did I miss an episode, was I off my A game? The trending line for me also allows me to give advertisers an running average for the show month to month. I can pull the report and show them that I have had x number of listeners each month for y number of months. This build trust with the media buyer.”
  • Distribution details how your show is being consumed across categories like web browsers, podcatchers, mobile apps, and so on.  This is a quick look at how your audience is accessing your podcast, and can again be detailed down to the specific episode.
  • Platforms then breaks the distribution down by Windows, Apple, Linux, iOS, Andorid, piecing out the data so you can see how the podcast is being consumed. Each of these pieces allow you to get a close-up snapshot of what’s happening, and may help you identify and engage with small sectors of your audience. “On my own show I give a shoutout to the Blackberry users that are listening,” says Cochrane. “While they are a small minority, this lets them know I know they are out there.”
  • Clients is a deep dive into how your podcast is being consumed. If, for example, you wanted to know how many listeners are using the iPodder desktop application, or PocketCast mobile app, this report will give you that information. With over 160 clients currently being reported on, this is a rich field of data just ready to be mined. “We give the podcaster the ability to see exactly how the show was accessed,” explains Cochrane. “It’s a good way to measure growing numbers of Android subscribers and where to focus messaging in the show and on social to attract segments of listeners that have not yet subscribed.”
  • Geography simply shows you where your audience is listening, and Blubrry’s regional reporting continues to become more specific and robust. Using this data, you can acknowledge larger sections of your audience or plan live events in areas where you know listeners congregate. Or, you can use the information to make listeners in less-represented places feel special. “On my show I have a huge contingent of listeners in Texas,” Cochrane says. “So I will give a shoutout to Texas or the lone listener down in Antartica. It allows me to understand how global my audience really is and keeps me grounded in remembering that some of my listeners may be expats or use English as a second language.”
  • Refers and Domains deliver insights on where traffic to your show is coming from. “I often get linked to by third parties. I can actually see how many listeners those referral links drove to my show,” explains Cochrane.

Sounds like a lot? It is, but remember that these reports are designed to be flexible, so you can use them as you need them. “Each of the reports we provide are like an onion: you can look at outside of the onion, or start peeling off layers all the way to the core. We wanted to make it easy for podcasters to determine where improvements could be made in their shows by looking all the way down to to the episode level.”

Remember, some of the above reporting is only available to Blubrry Pro Stats users. For just $5/month, you can have access to top-of-the-line stats to help you better understand your audience, monitor the growth and health of your show, and deliver the best possible information to potential advertisers.


Super Speed Listening



Almost every podcast app out there offers the ability to listen to the episode at a faster speed. Speeds range from 1.5x to 10x. Buzzfeed went the extra mile to find out just how often people do listen at rates faster than normal. Mike Dell and MacKenzie don’t seem too interested in listening this way, but read more in the show notes below.

Make sure to head to PodCon to see Todd and MacKenzie in Seattle in early December.

Podcasting requires quite a bit of different software at times and sometimes it’s nice to find a free version of something you need. They’re not too informed about these particular options, but it’s always nice to know what’s out there.

If you have any interest whatsoever in fast food, don’t skimp out on a new podcast, Fast Food History. Hosted by Blubrry’s own Mike Dell, this weekly show will give you info on a variety of fast food chains.

Enjoy Thanksgiving and tell us on social media about any Black Friday or Cyber Monday deals. Thanks for listening and please subscribe.

Fan of PowerPress? Leave us a review here.

Show notes:

Meet the People Who Listen to Podcasts at Super-Fast Speeds: Catch up on episodes quickly by, well, speeding them up a bit.

The best free audio editors of 2017: Free isn’t always bad – these options might be the one for you.

PodCon: The podcasting conference for people who love podcasts. December 9-10 in Seattle.

Fast Food History: First episode is out, tune in for episodes released every Friday.


New Geographic and Client Reporting Make Blubrry Stats Even More Robust



Blubrry’s customers already know that we have the best podcast statistics around. And in an effort to ensure that our users are always up-to-date with the most robust and useful information available, we’ve just introduced two new features: more in-depth international region reporting, and the ability to detect 7 new clients delivering your podcast’s listeners. What does that mean for the over 45,000 shows that use our stats?

Expanded Region Reporting:

From now on, Blubrry stats users will be able to take an even closer look at their international listener information, with the addition of regional reporting for Canada, Great Britain, and Brazil. While those countries once showed only summarized data, now you’ll get more localized information: for example, you’ll be able to see how many of your Canadian listeners are listening from Ontario versus British Columbia.

“This addition will give podcasters deeper data,” explains Blubrry CEO, Todd Cochrane. “We update stats on a regular basis, but this change gives users more granularity of where their media is being consumed.” In particular, this information is useful for podcasts advertising in those areas.

An example of the kind of in-depth regional data now offered via Blubrry Pro Stats.

New Podcast Client Reporting:

Simply put, a “client” is the application through which listeners access your podcast. We’ve added 7 new clients to our reporting, including:

  • Alexa
  • RadioPublic
  • TuneIn Radio(Android)
  • Radio USA
  • iHeartRadio(Android)
  • doubleTwist CloudPlayer(Android)
  • LibVLC

We have added a category called Intelligent Personal Assistants, which are the engines that process your requests via the smart devices they’re connected to, explains Angelo Mandato, CIO of Blubrry. “An Intelligent Personal Assistant can reside in smart TV remotes, thermostats, your mobile devices, smart speakers, etc.” As other Intelligent Personal Assistants, like Google Assistant and Siri, reach more than a 1% market share, we at Blubrry will begin adding them as an available client for our Pro Stats users.

While client reporting is available to both Pro Stats and free stats users (available when you add your podcast to our directory), free stats only show the top 10 clients, so it’s unlikely you’ll see them show up unless you’ve gone Pro. Curious how many people are listening to your podcast via an IPA like Alexa or Echo? Consider upgrading to Pro Stats today.


Building a Show and Branding YOUR Show – YP018



Building a show and branding it isn’t easy. There are many facets that go into the making of a show and reputation, and it’s harder than many podcasters expect to create a brand on their own. CastFeedValidator.com is now part of the Blubrry tools and services that are provided to the podcasting community. Changes are not coming soon, as some might have been worried about.

Apple tends to change things up, but one thing they haven’t done lately is change the way ranking works. Mike and Todd are here to debunk some of the ideas that people have around how the entire process over at Apple works. Lastly, as always some tips and insight into support issues that Blubrry faces. Thanks for tuning in to episode 18 of Your Podcast with Todd Cochrane and Mike Dell.

Thanks for listening to the show and please subscribe at PowerPressPodcast.com.

We love our PowerPress users, please leave us a review.

News:

Topics:

  • Building a show; not always as easy as you might think: What is the value of your podcast brand?
  • Joining a network, when to join one and why.
  • Apple Podcasts (iTunes) ranking: What does and does NOT affect it.

Support:

  • Our pet peeves: Asking the same question to multiple team members at Blubrry will get you the same answer (most of the time).
  • Apple podcasts subscribe links in PowerPress:
    1. Submit your feed to Apple Podcasts.
    2. Wait to be approved by Apple (1-5 days, normally faster).
    3. Add the URL that Apple sends you in the approval email into the “iTunes Subscription URL” box in the Destinations tab of PowerPress Settings. This populates the buttons and links for Apple Podcasts (iTunes) on your site.
    4. Repeat for Google Play, Stitcher and Tunein Radio (you have to turn on those links in the website tab as well).
  • Themes and plugins in PowerPress Sites Basic and Deluxe: Why you can’t add your own.

To ask questions or to comment on the show, contact Todd and Mike here: yourpodcast@blubrry.com


Podcasting Around the Holidays



Blubrry has been collecting podcasting data since day one when they started in 2005. Our statistics allows us to collect information on how people are listening – the trends, what they do, what they don’t do, etc. At the end of the day we regularly come to conclusions on this data and share it with the world. Recently, a blog post went out about some of this information, you can find it on PowerPressPodcast.com.

An RSS feed can be confusing or a hassle to some, which is why services such as feed validators are so important and utilized. Recently, Blubrry acquired widely used and highly recommeneded, Cast Feed Validator.

NaPodPoMo – Podcast for 30 days straight. This challenge is great for any podcaster, and MacKenzie has already failed at it. No worries, she has a different take on 30 days straight and will be working on a different type of podcasting initiative for the month of November.

Lastly, MacKenzie shares her podcasting chronicle – setting a second goal for herself before December. The holidays can feel like a burden for your podcast, but don’t let them get in the way – there are so many listeners out there that are utilizing their free time around the holidays to listen to new shows and catch up on old episodes.

Thanks for listening and please subscribe! If you’d like to be on the show email MacKenzie, she’s always looking for new guests.

Show notes:

FinCon: In case you missed out, it’s a financial expo for media creators in the financial industry. Lots of potential podcasters attended.
Cast Feed Validator: Now in Blubrry’s hands, with no major changes coming to the service in the near future.
Podcasting Data: Information you didn’t know you wanted about the podcasting industry. Hint, more people are listening to podcasts.
NaPodPoMo: Will you be podcasting for almost everyday of the month of November? Become a better podcaster simply by podcasting more.


Blubrry Announces the Acquisition of CastFeedValidator.com



(Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 6) — Blubrry, a subsidiary of RawVoice, is proud to announce the acquisition of the leading podcast RSS-feed validator, Cast Feed Validator. The move will provide consistency to podcasters, improve up-time of the site and allow for tech and hardware upgrades to the site. It has also acquired PodcastingPlugin.com as part of the package from The Software Group.

Todd Cochrane, RawVoice/Blubrry CEO, stressed that other than upgrades, the site will remain intact and a free resource for the entire podcasting space. “We purchased the site to make sure it is around for the long haul, and there are no immediate plans to change the site,” he said.

Validating a podcast feed is something everyone in podcasting has to accomplish periodically. Podcast feed validation helps content creators and podcast support teams find and resolve issues that can cause sites and apps to be unable to process feeds.

“Cast Feed Validator fits into our mission perfectly in providing tools and services for podcasters,” said Mike Dell, Blubrry customer support coordinator. “This is a big win for podcasters and opens up new possibilities moving forward under the umbrella of RawVoice and the Blubrry family of podcast tools and innovation.”

About
Blubrry is a podcasting community and directory with more than 450,000 shows. Blubrry gives creators the power to make money, get detailed audience measurements and host their audio, video and websites. Whether you are a media creator, advertiser or media consumer, Blubrry is your digital media interface.

Blubrry Podcasting


Exclusive Blubrry Data Indicates Podcasts Are Still Rising In Popularity



Recently, Blubrry CIO Angelo Mandato presented at the Engineering Society Conference during NAB Show New York. Drawing on data collected from the more than 85,000 podcasts Blubrry serves through its comprehensive menu of services, Mandato provided a wealth of information on podcast consumption, growth, listening habits, category preferences and more. Here is a sampling of the data revealed in the presentation:

Who’s Listening To Podcasts?

Survey data collected by Blubrry indicated that listeners are relatively young and educated. Mandato’s presentation indicated that men listen to more podcasts than women, 72% compared to 28%, and that most listeners, 33.68%, are in their late twenties or early thirties. 21.74% of survey respondents fell between the ages of 36 and 45, making that the second-largest age demographic of podcast listeners. Most listeners (27.27%) earn between $40,000 and $74,999, with 24.91 % of listeners earning between $0 and $39,999 per year. Overwhelmingly, listeners have at least a high school diploma (98%) with 80% having earned some kind of degree.

What Are People Listening To?

Comedy still dominates as the most popular niche, with Sports and Recreation, TV & Film, News & Politics, and Society & Culture the next most-popular topic areas. Kids & Family brings up the rear as the least-popular podcast topic, possibly indicating plenty of room for growth in the future.

How Are People Listening?

Blubrry’s highly-detailed statistics indicate that approximately ½ of web browser traffic is coming from mobile devices, while nearly 63% of podcasts are consumed via mobile apps. iOS still dominates, with 57.1% of all podcasts being listened to via the Apple Podcasts app. We predict that desktop browsers will level off at 5% (currently at 6.8%, down from 13% in 2013) and that, by 2020, Android market share will be 35%, iOS about 55%, and the remaining 10% will be spread across browsers and niche devices like Alexa, Google Home, and Smart TVs.

Will Podcasting Continue To Grow?

The last 10 years have shown explosive growth in podcasting, and tremendous opportunity as well. While there are currently over 425,000 podcasts available today – that’s 300% more than in 2007 – only 30% of those shows have released episodes in the past 3 months. With listener consumption up 500% since 2007, now’s the time to jump on board the podcasting trend if you haven’t already – or, revive a show that’s fading and commit to consistent and frequent publishing from now on.

This is just a sampling of the data shared in Mandato’s presentation – you can read the whole thing here.


Two Free Podcast Hosting Services Shut Down – Your Podcast 017



Podiant and Opinion, two free podcast hosting companies shut down recently. Should you do a transcript of your show? There are many positives and negatives of written transcripts is for your podcast. Advertising in podcasting is rising and becoming more relevant for all types of podcasters. Podcasters should be aware and begin preparing for advertising ahead of time. Lastly, there is no way to know how many people are subscribed to your show. All of this is discussed on today’s episode of Your Podcast with Todd Cochrane and Mike Dell.

Thanks for listening to the show and please subscribe at PowerPressPodcast.com.

We love our PowerPress users, please leave us a review.

News

Topics

Support

  • Who are my subscribers? Why nobody can tell you that other than your listeners.
  • Having a podcast PAGE on your site and why that is just extra work. Use the blog roll instead. Blogging and podcasting are very, very similar. Your blog posts should be with your podcast posts (assuming they are on a similar topic.)
  • Upgrading and downgrading podcast hosting every month; Blubrry has many customers doing this. The only way to do this where it’s not costing you more is to upgrade 2 days prior to the next payment date.

To ask questions or to comment on the show, contact Todd and Mike here: yourpodcast@blubrry.com


Everyday Superhumans, a Podcast for the Passionate



Non-profit organizations – have you ever thought about how many there are just in your neighborhood? Kyle Smith of the podcast, Everyday Superhumans, shares his experience as co-host of the show and how it evolved into focusing solely on non-profit organizations, and highlighting those that are trying to bring a little more humanity to the world. Give it a listen to hear about passionate humans in the Austin area.

Government agencies and organizations are trying to improve their outreach via podcasts. Easier said that done to gets facts straight from the source nowadays, and this is a way to ensure that information is being shared with their desired audience. Are you listening to any podcasts hosted by a government source? Maybe one you’re interested in will start a show soon.

Advertising on a podcast, when you don’t have a traditional sponsor. It’s possible and prepares you for when the day an advertiser calls on your show. Advertisers are looking for a success story and they want reassurance beforehand that you’ll be able to provide a quality ad for them. Give them no doubt you’re ready for this by recording a sample. More tips are included in the episode, including leaving two seconds on air where it would be appropriate to slide an ad into the episode.

Thanks for listening and please subscribe. If you’re interested in being on the show or have any comments, reach out: mackenzie@blubrry.com.

Show notes:

Government Agencies Try Podcasting: Only seems fitting they give the audible medium a try, audiences are bound to show up soon.
Everyday Superhumans: Restoring your faith in humanity. One episode at a time. Hosted by Kyle Smith and Charlie Hilton, based out of Austin, Texas.
Advertising for the future: Learn why you should start advertising before an advertiser reaches out to you.


Preparing for Podcast Advertising’s Future



Podcast AdverisingFor many podcasters, the ultimate goal is monetization. But before sponsors come calling, there are things you can do to prepare for that day (hopefully soon!) that your episodes are sponsored? Following these steps will guarantee that your show will not be passed over when an advertiser reviews your show.

You must consider the following.

Long before you’re considering pursuing sponsorships – or before sponsors knock on your virtual door – you should be running “practice” ads – even if it’s just promoting your own show or an affiliate deal that fits your show content, says Blubrry CEO, Todd Cochrane.

The reasons are as follows:

  1. Running ads early and often is good practice. “If you’re not already practicing or doing ads, you aren’t going to be good out of the gate,” when paying advertisers are interested in working with you, explains Cochrane. “We want podcasters to get in the mindset of running ads and perfecting their ad delivery.”
  2. It gets your listeners accustomed to hearing ads on your show. Imagine you’ve been running a sponsor-free podcast for two years, and have accumulated a moderate but loyal and growing audience. One day an advertiser that’s a perfect fit approaches you about working together, and you say “yes.” Not only will it feel awkward to you to suddenly have to deliver a sponsor spot where there never was one before, but it’ll also be jarring for your listeners to hear an ad for the first time on episode 100. The earlier and more consistently you start driving home the idea that advertising supports the sponsors that make the show possible, the more likely that your listeners will accept and even embrace your ads.
  3. It gives you an inventory of sample ads. The best way to show a potential sponsor that you can deliver effective ad copy or the creative genius you are is to provide them with ad samples you’ve delivered in the past, and one great way to do that is by having a reel of sponsored spots you’ve done. The best way to save those is to save the clips with 30 seconds of lead-in, the ad spot and 30 seconds of post ad content. This will give advertisers a sense of how you lead in, deliver and roll out of an ad spot. Doing ads, even if they are affiliate deals or promotions of your own show or your colleague’s shows, automatically gives you a selection of sample build a reel when you need to “wow” an advertiser.
  4. Preparing for a changing advertising landscape. Start keeping track on every single episode where an ad could be injected into your content. If you’re doing your show and find a natural transition spot record that time hack. HH:MM:SS.sss to the best of your ability. More on this later.

So you’re convinced that it’s time to start running ads on your podcast? Great! Now you might be wondering how to get started, and the best way to go about it. Follow these tips:

  • Just start. Even before you have a paying advertiser, there are plenty of things you can promote. Some ideas:

    • CJ.com or Share A Sale are great places to get access to affiliate deals with low barriers to entry and often attractive commission rates and promotion codes.
    • If there’s a product you use often and love, Google the name of the brand + “affiliate” to see if they run their own affiliate program and apply for it.
    • You may be connected with influencers and thought leaders who sell courses and information products online. Often these gurus will offer affiliate partnerships when they launch new products and services.
    • What about your own product or service? An ebook or e-course can be a great way to get people to visit your site, and it gives you something to promote on your show.
    • Ask other podcasters if they would consider doing a promotion swap: you advertise their show during a sponsor segment, and in exchange, they advertise yours.
    • You can simply sign up as an Amazon Associate, and use your ad spots to direct people to links in your show notes.
    • When you’re left without anything to promote, just promote yourself! Talk about an event you’ll be attending or a blog post you recently wrote, or just talk about other episodes that might interest your listeners. The trick is to structure it like a sponsored segment and place it in a spot where you’d like to run ads. The closer your promotional segments are to “real” sponsored spots, the better the practice will be.
  • Keep the ads relevant. While it might be tempting to run the same affiliate ads as all the big podcasters seem to, consider whether a potential affiliate is really a good fit for your particular show and your particular audience. You might be better off promoting a friend’s podcast for free if your audience will love it and they’ll return the favor, than plugging a brand that your listeners aren’t likely to be interested in.
  • Deliver. Every time. “Treat every ad, even one you’re running as a test as if you were getting a multi-thousand-dollar check for the ad spot and deliver accordingly,” suggests Cochrane. “It’ll make it easier for prospective advertisers to want to sign on with your show.” It’ll also make your show’s quality that much better.
  • Be consistent. When you’re putting your show outline together, plan out your ad spots just the same as you would any other regular feature. Remember, you always want your ad to feel like a well-thought-out, planned part of the show – never an afterthought or a throwaway. “Run an ad in every single episode, even if you don’t have an advertiser signed on for that episode,” says Cochrane. “You only get good at running ads when you’re really running ads…so always run an ad.”
  • Prepare for ads to be dynamically inserted in the future.  “Dynamic insertion” refers to a type of ad inserted at a pre-determined time in the episode (Step 4). As your show continues to grow and as the podcasting advertising space evolves, you will have more and more opportunities to monetize through what we expect to be brand advertising and hybrid host endorsement with ad spots that are dynamically-inserted that have targeted delivery and then are removed or replaced day to day, week to week, month to month. You won’t be able to take advantage of these future opportunities unless you plan now and for dynamic insertion as you’re recording and editing. “For example, if you pay attention while you’re editing and at a certain timestamp find a place that sounds like it would be a good place to transition and insert an ad, you can insert a two-second pause, record the time hack for the middle of the pause where the ad can be inserted at a later date,” says Cochrane. Podcasters need to plan for dynamic insertion of ads and consciously planning their episodes and notating those sweet spots so that in the near future, if a sponsorship deal comes up that you are ready to capitalize, so we can drop an ad in that spot.

Ready to start looking for paying advertisers and making money from your podcast? Consider joining Blubrry’s advertising network.